CARLTON BY McCARVER
Sir:
Tim McCarver's tribute to his former batterymate (Lefty Has the Right Approach, July 21) was well deserved. As a longtime friend of both, I have spent hundreds of hours with them in lobby and pub sectors—always spirited encounters. "Lefty" is visceral, bright, intuitive, making my visits with him more than just another memory.
VINCENT DEPAUL HURLEY
Houston

Sir:
Steve Carlton's accomplishments as a pitcher are indeed outstanding. The truly amazing point, however, is that he plays in Philadelphia and has been able to achieve all of his heroics for the Phillies. I am sure Steve understands the pathos of being a Philadelphia sports fan and as a result he has therefore lost his voice. A little warning, however! If the Phillies or the Eagles ever win their respective championships, the celebration in Philly will make the Boston Tea Party look like a Tupperware party for cloistered monks.
EUGENE J. MAGINNIS JR.
Philadelphia

ULTRALIGHT FLIGHT
Sir:
I enjoyed your article on ultralight airplanes (It's a Bird, It's a Plane, It's a..., July 21). How can I order a kit for an ultralight?
JOHN HARDHAM
Hockessin, Del.

•The Hang Gliders Manufacturers Association, 13620 Saticoy, Van Nuys, Calif. 91402, cannot fill specific orders but will distribute requests to the various manufacturers.—ED.

MAN NOT MYTH
Sir:
That was an excellent inside story on Chuck Noll (Man Not Myth, July 21). Although he does pass the credit, he is the bottom line for Pittsburgh's outstanding team.
GARY BOARDMAN
Pittsburgh

Sir:
Thank you for sharing everything I ever wanted to know about Chuck Noll but local sportswriters were afraid to ask. When it comes to the best coach of the finest football team ever—it's Noll-o contendere.
RORY GEESEMAN
Pittsburgh

DISAPPOINTED OLYMPIANS
Sir:
In Detour on the High Road (July 21), I particularly liked the piece on Peter Schnugg. It brought back memories of how tough an opponent he was.

He and I played on the same high school "all-league" water polo team in 1968, and Peter and Jon Svendsen (another Olympic team member) were the class of the league.
STEPHEN A. THATCHER
New York City

DAYTONA FIRECRACKER
Sir:
Bob Ottum's article on the Firecracker 400 race (They Had a Blast at Daytona, July 14) was superb. It made me smell, see and hear the arena of stock car racing. And remember, there are a lot of race fans out here, SI.
A.B. HENRY JR.
Alexandria, Va.

BAD NEWS BEANBALLS
Sir:
While reading Steve Wulf's article (They're Up in Arms Over Beanballs, July 14), I was reminded of a similar incident in a Little League game, which I was umpiring. A youngster, hit by a pitch, and having watched too much TV, charged the mound. I ended up throwing him out before he could get hold of the pitcher, who was running for his life. "Beanballs" happen all the time in Little League. I think the pro players, hitters and pitchers alike, are to blame, and maybe fights wouldn't break out in major league games if the major-leaguers wouldn't act like Little Leaguers.
MARTIN PELGER
Globe, Ariz.

THE KNIFEMAKER
Sir:
The article on knifemaker R.W. Loveless (On the Cutting Edge, July 14) was both a joy and a surprise for me. However, there are a few things that bothered me. Bob Loveless' opinion is that collectors are rich, greedy fools who look at knives as a status symbol or merely something to show off. The author seems to have gotten this impression, too. As a collector, I have to say that this conception is unfounded. Collectors of knives are doing the same as the man who buys a Picasso or a Ferrari. That man could just as well buy a $14.95 wall mural at Sears, Roebuck or a used 1969 Chevy for $300. But he wants something he can be proud of, something he can look at with total, shining admiration.
ANDY SWANSON
Yorkville, Ill.

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, New York, 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)