19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

September 14, 1980

ON TOP
Sir:
I applaud Joe Marshall, Mike DelNagro and Brooks Clark for their fine work on the College Football Issue (Sept. 1). I wouldn't have picked the Top 20 any differently—except for Ohio State, which I would have ranked No. 1 over Pitt, instead of No. 2.
BARRY FABYAN
Worthington, Ohio

Sir:
The Ohio State Buckeyes will march to the Big Ten title, a Rose Bowl victory and the national championship this year. And probably next year, too.
PHILIP A. GIBBS
Hillsboro, Ohio

Sir:
All I can say is Roll, Tide, Roll! Three in a row for 'Bama.
MICHAEL GANN
Hamilton, Ala.

Sir:
When Jan. 1 rolls around, you'll forget Pitt and the rest because Nebraska'll be the best!
ED THIEL
Omaha

Sir:
Oklahoma, the team of the '70s, will also be the team of the '80s.
KEVIN KOOPMEINERS
Melrose, Minn.

Sir:
There is a popular bumper sticker in South Bend that says: GOD MADE NOTRE DAME NO. 1. I think most people would go along with Him.
JIM KLIMEK
South Bend

AT MIZZOU
Sir:
Thanks for the wonderful and long-overdue article on Missouri football (Hold That Tiger—Big Came at Mizzou! Sept. 1). Something not readily apparent from the story is the far-reaching effect of a big game like Mizzou-Oklahoma. Here in Florida, the Tampa-Lakeland-Orlando chapters of the Missouri alumni association gather in Plant City each year to listen to the game over a local radio station. Similarly, other Mizzou alumni from coast to coast tune in to broadcasts, have them "piped in" by telephone or just stay glued to their radios for scores.

Today people rarely become involved with something bigger than themselves. Loyalty to an institution, fostered in large part by college football, is a value lost to most of society. It would be unfortunate if college football were nitpicked and legislated to death, although it is currently walking a tightrope between big business and integrity and self-restraint. Thank goodness many fine schools like Missouri have long had balanced programs.
ARTHUR W. SMITH
Lakeland, Fla.

Sir:
Thank you for pointing out that you don't have to be the winningest team to be the most spirited.
JAMES H. VORWALD
Florissant, Mo.

Sir:
I was mildly surprised to find that the Missouri fans consider Oklahoma their big game. Having been an undergraduate at OU and still being a diehard Sooner fan, I have witnessed or heard of no greater rivalry in the nation than the Sooners' annual meeting with the Texas Longhorns in the Cotton Bowl.

It is a tribute to the richness of Oklahoma's gridiron tradition and the quality of its recent teams that many Sooner opponents, including Texas, Nebraska, Oklahoma State and Missouri, look upon their clash with OU as their big game. It also makes me respect Coach Barry Switzer all the more for keeping his squads mentally and physically prepared to play the big game week after week.
LARRY M. MARCUS, M.D.
Phoenix

SEEING GREEN
Sir:
How refreshing to pick up SI's College Football Issue and discover that it features not a running back, but a defensive end, the incomparable Hugh Green (Green Light for the Panthers, Sept. 1). The story is superb and the cover a masterpiece.

In the final paragraph, however, Green states that the 1980 Pitt team is better than the 1976 national championship team and that all the '76 squad had going for it was Tony Dorsett. He is wrong. Among other outstanding players on that team was Quarterback Matt Cavanaugh, who was voted MVP in the "championship" Sugar Bowl game and next year was named an All-America.
DON METZ
Mount Pleasant, Pa.

Sir:
Congratulations on a superb cover of Hugh Green with the black panther in the background. Green is a phenomenon. I know. I saw him last season against Penn State.
BOB CERO
Williamsport, Pa.

Sir:
In a year when South Carolina, a school that isn't a prominent football power, has by far the best running back in college football, George Rogers, you wrote about the top defensive end, the top noseguard and the top safety, all of whom are from big-time schools, Pitt, Florida State, UCLA, respectively. Don't the unknown schools ever get a chance?
ED SAXON
Aiken, S.C.

TWO-WAY JINX
Sir:
In your one-paragraph analysis of the Ivy League, you mention that Yale has a "jinx" on Dartmouth and that the Big Green has scored only 13 points against the Elis in their last three meetings. You fail to say that in these same three meetings, two of which Dartmouth has won. Yale has scored a total of only six points against the always-stingy Green defense. Who has the jinx on whom?
PETER L. WELDY
Bloomington, Minn.

MORE BY GEORGE
Sir:
While Ron Fimrite's recent articles, By George, He's Some Hitter (Aug. 11) and Brett May Do It Yet (Sept. 1), have listed George Brett's main statistics, an additional one—my favorite for stumping trivia buffs—would have further emphasized Brett's hitting ability. In 1979 he hit 20 or more doubles, triples and home runs, a feat last accomplished by an American Leaguer around 1940. If my memory serves, it was Joe Vosmik, an outfielder for the Cleveland Indians, who did it then. In the National League, I believe Willie Mays was the last to do it, 20 years ago.
HERM BRUNOTTE
Kenmore, N.Y.

•Vosmik never did it, but Jeff Heath, another Cleveland outfielder, did, in 1941. Mays performed the feat in 1957.—ED.

MORE FROM K.C.
Sir:
Your four great articles in the Sept. 1 issue on Missouri heroes—George Brett, the Kansas City Royals, Tom Watson and the University of Missouri football Tigers—made our Mid-American hearts very happy! We Kansas Citians expect to provide you with even more opportunities for articles on our local talent. Our Kansas City Chiefs and Kansas City Kings anticipate great seasons, too.
DICK BERKLEY
Mayor
Kansas City, Mo.

Address editorial mail to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, New York, 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)