19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

March 29, 1982

REGGIE
Sir:
Congratulations to Ron Fimrite on an excellent article on Reggie Jackson (For Both Love and Money, March 15). If anyone deserves happiness, Jackson does. For the past couple of seasons "the straw that stirs the drink" was in a no-win situation. George Steinbrenner apparently didn't like Reggie and was determined to win the battle. Sorry, George. You lost. Reggie and Gene Autry won this round, and I, for one, hope they win Round 2 in October.
MARK FRIESS
Easton, Kans.

Sir:
The article concerning Reggie Jackson's joining the California Angels is an interesting update on Angel owner Gene Autry's futile yet continuing efforts to buy a World Series championship by throwing large sums of money at fading superstars. Sad to say, the only champion Autry will ever be associated with is the one he used to ride in the Westerns he made four decades ago.
LANNY R. MIDDINGS
San Ramon, Calif.

Sir:
Does Reggie Jackson hold the record for appearing on the cover in different uniforms? We remember seeing him on your cover in the garb of the A's, Orioles and Yankees and were wondering if his appearance in a fourth uniform, that of the California Angels, makes this an SI first.
MICHAEL O'SHEA
JOHN BREDAR
Evanston, Ill.

•SI has never kept official track of such a record, but a review of past covers indicates that Jackson is the leader in this category. Billy Martin ranks second, having appeared, appropriately attired, as manager of the Twins, Rangers and Yankees. Martin also made the cover as a Yankee player.—ED.

Sir:
Reggie did it again! How about a list of the Top Ten, those who have made your cover the most often?
JOHN A. COCHARIO
Madison, N.J.

•The Top Five are Muhammad Ali (28 cover appearances), Jack Nicklaus (19), Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (16), Arnold Palmer (14) and Bill Walton (14). Behind them come Sonny Liston, with nine appearances, and Reggie Jackson, Mickey Mantle, Joe Namath, Floyd Patterson and Pete Rose, with eight apiece, making it a Top 11.—ED.

Sir:
How many more times is Reggie Jackson going to appear on your cover? Come on, enough is enough.
GARY DIETZ
Philadelphia

PETE DYE'S COURSE
Sir:
Pete Dye is a genius (Target Golf Is the Aim, March 15). I have been dreaming about the 17th hole at the Players Club for three straight nights!
HUGH P. SMITH
Salisbury, Mass

Sir:
Pete Dye has the right idea. The game of golf should be brought back to where there is more emphasis on accuracy than on distance. As Barry McDermott said, Arnold Palmer could land his jet on most of the fairways the pros play on the Tour. It's fun to watch the players shoot 15 or 20 under par in a tournament, but the courses that produce such low numbers are really not a true test for a great golfer.
JEFFREY MULLIN
Needham, Mass.

Sir:
Only one word describes the Tournament Players Club course: contrived.
COOPER E. TAYLOR JR.
Atlanta

SPURRED ON
Sir:
Bruce Newman's article on the San Antonio Spurs (Best Team You've Never Seen, March 8) couldn't have been better timed. The evening after I read it, I watched Sidney Moncrief, SI's cover subject of a few weeks ago (Feb. 22), and the Milwaukee Bucks take on the Spurs. Those two excellent teams scrapped and fought for 63 minutes in the best game I've ever seen. In the stretch, the game turned into a shootout between George (Iceman) Gervin and Brian Winters. After watching that historic matchup, won by the Spurs in triple overtime, I can hardly wait for the playoffs.
FRED TONEY
North Fond du Lac, Wis.

Sir:
On the night I read Bruce Newman's article on the Spurs, I had occasion to watch them play the Boston Celtics, who were without injured All-Stars Tiny Archibald and Larry Bird. Starting Celtic Guard Chris Ford was also hampered by injury and saw only six minutes of playing time.

A Spur blowout? Not quite. Although George Gervin put on a dazzling display good for 48 points, the undermanned Celtics had five men in double figures and prevailed 110-101. The team concept, which is foreign to the Spurs yet so much a part of the Celtics' heritage, was very much in evidence that night.

Writer Newman may be a pizza aficionado (LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER, March 8), but he should be advised that the NBA's upper crust still resides in Boston.
LLOYD BENSON
Swampscott, Mass.

Sir:
We were stunned to read Bruce Newman's suggestion that the Spurs' trainer is a better player than the Lakers' Kurt Rambis. We had just seen Rambis spend the first half of a Knick game creating numerous scoring opportunities for the Lakers with his unending hustle and desire. While not the most graceful or flashy of NBA players, Rambis treats Laker fans to tenacious defense, aggressive rebounding and all-out effort.
MICHAEL WIRTZ
STANTON SHORT
Riverside, Calif.

REVERE'S HORSE
Sir:
In his article He's a Cut Above the Rest (March 15), William Leggett says, "The best horse to come out of New England was ridden by Paul Revere and nobody even remembers its name."

That, sadly, appears to be quite true. On the other hand, it can't be said that Revere's horse has never been remembered. Tribute was paid to Revere's horse in the great musical comedy of 1931-32, Of Thee I Sing, in which, during a "session" of the U.S. Senate, a Senator from Massachusetts got up to say that while Paul Revere had been justly honored for his famous ride, his horse—it was called "Jenny" in the book, but as far as anyone knows its real name was never recorded—had been overlooked.

Quick to agree, the presiding officer of the Senate ordered a moment of silent tribute to the departed horse from Massachusetts. The Senators then bowed their heads in respectful silence.

Man o'War never received a finer tribute than old what's her name.
LANDON MANNING
Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

Letters should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and be addressed to The Editor, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

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