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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

April 05, 1982
April 05, 1982

Table of Contents
April 5, 1982

NCAA Basketball
NCAA Swimming
Tom Kite
Stanley Floyd
Tom McMillen
Baseball
Horse Racing
Wheaties
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Edited by Gay Flood

TROUBLE IN FLORIDA
Sir:
As a lifetime Florida resident, I am truly grateful for your attention to my state's environmental dilemma. Your articles There's Trouble in Paradise (Feb. 9, 1981) and Special Report: Anatomy of a Man-made Drought (March 15) echo an occasional warning about the threat to Florida's water supply sounded by responsible newspapers around the state. Unfortunately those who issue such warnings are lightly regarded Cassandras to land developers who make big bucks by luring more residents to Florida while further complicating our water problems. Perhaps further exposure is what is needed to awaken a state filling with new residents to the perils at hand.
ROBERT DRESCHER JR.
Silver Springs, Fla.

This is an article from the April 5, 1982 issue Original Layout

Sir:
Your special report on the water situation in Florida was excellent. We are annual visitors to Florida and are dismayed by the lack of appreciation for environmental issues by the natives. My son did a college paper in 1970 on the water problem in Florida. A lot of this information has been available for 12 to 15 years.

Stupid politicians and greedy land developers have raped Florida of its most valuable natural resource: water.
JOHN E. MILLER
Hutchinson, Minn.

Sir:
What do droughts have to do with sports? I expected to read about Marvelous Marvin Hagler, the New York Islanders and the grueling Ironman World Triathlon.
CHRISTOPHER CHICHESTER
Lake Grove, N.Y.

GEORGE ALLEN IN MONTREAL
Sir:
Hiring George Allen (For Allen, This Is Alien Territory, March 15) to make the Montreal Alouettes cost effective is the same as appointing an arsonist as fire chief. Allen is nonpareil as a coach, but as a guardian of the pocketbook he's terribly miscast.
ANDREA MEDICI
Corpus Christi, Texas

Sir:
In your article George Allen expresses a wish for a translation into French of the motto "To win without peril is to triumph without glory." He need only refer to Corneille's great play, Le Cid, Act II, Scene 2. The passage reads: "A vaincre sans péril, on triomphe sans gloire."

However, his other wish, the one for a Grey Cup, will not be granted. The Canadian Football League champions will be Ottawa's beloved Rough Riders.
GILLES RENAUD
Ottawa

Sir:
I read with pleasure your article on George Allen. It might be of interest to your readers to know that in addition to running and reading, he has been serving with distinction, and in his usual hardworking style, as chairman of the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports.
HOWARD F. FLETCHER
Special Advisor
President's Council on Physical
Fitness and Sports
Atherton, Calif.

WIFFLERS
Sir:
Talk about memories! The Wiffle Ball story by Franz Lidz (FIRST PERSON. March 22) made me feel half my age. We weren't as organized as the Herman Wiffle Ball Four, but we had a six-man league in Merion Park. Pa., just a few home runs east of Penn Valley, that predated the Herman league by several years. Our games were all played at "Myers Field," which was split between the pitcher's mound and home plate by our street. Our star pitcher, Joe Reichman, had a knuckle curve that was utterly predictable—somewhere in the strike zone above or below your bat.

Oh, that we could continue our competition! But we six now live in five different states. However, if we ever all come home, Lidz, Herman and company had better be prepared for a challenge match.
LUIS R. DORFMAN
Gulfport, Miss.

Sir:
Many fond memories were recalled to my mind when I read Franz Lidz's article on Wiffle Ball. Our version, played in the '50s, consisted of hitting between two three-story tenements in Brockton, Mass. The pitcher and the batter were a mere 30 feet apart, which meant that the fastball was one of our best pitches. Many games were interrupted while we retrieved a four-bagger from the roof, and our mothers were kept busy patching up legs and arms damaged in reckless dives for ground balls. Although Lidz's Herman Wiffle Ball sounds like fun, we city players would have dominated his team in a seven-game series.
RICHARD ERICKSON
Monroe, Conn.

KENTUCKY'S GAME
Sir:
To add to your March 22 SCORECARD item concerning the University of Kentucky's reluctance to take on intrastate rival Louisville, it appears that the Cardinals aren't the only ones to experience Kentucky's so-called "failure of competitive spirit." Kentucky is being dropped from Notre Dame's schedule after next season because Kentucky refuses to play Notre Dame under a home-and-home arrangement—that is, with games played alternately in Lexington and South Bend.

As many people are aware, Kentucky has enjoyed the luxury of a 10-year agreement whereby all basketball games between the Wildcats and the Irish have taken place in Kentucky. That contract has expired, and after next season, when the teams are scheduled to play in South Bend under the terms of a current two-year agreement, Kentucky has made it clear that it is unwilling to continue to meet Notre Dame under a home-and-home arrangement, which would be much fairer to both teams.
DANIEL R. SCHWEERS
Normal, Ill.

Sir:
I agree wholeheartedly with your SCORE-CARD item. It's about time the Wildcats stopped avoiding the Cardinals. Just think how much money a Kentucky-Louisville game could put in both teams' coffers.
GUY CECIL
Bardstown, Ky.

Sir:
Kentucky's failure to play Louisville is, in my opinion, being blown out of proportion, as the game itself would be if it were played. UK's loss to Middle Tennessee was also blown out of proportion. To say "Hall and his Wildcats don't have much to be proud of is totally unfair, especially to the young men who play for Kentucky. Why should they be ashamed of a 22-8 season, when anyone else would be very proud of it?
BYRON JODY
Batavia, Ohio

Sir:
Why should Kentucky have to play Louisville? It's sad when politics comes into sports. If Kentucky is forced to play Louisville, then it should also be forced to play Western Kentucky, Eastern Kentucky, Murray State, Morehead State and perhaps even Bellarmine, Centre College and the Kentucky School for the Blind. If this sounds absurd to you, then you'll know how absurd your editorial sounded to me.
STEVE L. FAHRINGER
Louisville

Letters should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and be addressed to The Editor, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.