USF AND QUINTIN DAILEY
Sir:
What a banner year for SI! Your coverage of the seasonal sports has been fantastic, most notably this baseball season, and then there have been your blockbuster special reports—on Don Reese and cocaine in the NFL ("I'm Not Worth a Damn," June 14) and on the University of San Francisco and Quintin Dailey (Bringing Down the Curtain, Aug. 9)—your two best sports journalism pieces in recent memory. Please continue the high quality and fine writing you have brought us this year. It's nice to read the inside story, even if it hurts a little.
MATTHEW FASANG
Troy, Mich.

Sir:
Applause! Applause! You've done a great job the past few months. First the cocaine article by Don Reese with John Underwood and now the probing story on the University of San Francisco and Quintin Dailey by Robert H. Boyle and Roger Jackson. You have proved to be the magazine that finds the major problems in athletics today and gives a true picture of the situation and of what needs to be done.
KRIS WALTERS
Boonville, Mo.

Sir:
After reading the article about Quintin Dailey and the death of USF basketball, I'm convinced that the Rev. John Lo Schiavo, S.J., president of the university, was correct in "bringing down the curtain" on the program there. Sure, Dailey is responsible for his embarrassing behavior on Dec. 21. He alone knows the disgrace resulting from the events of that night. But it seems to me Dailey is merely the symbol of a diseased system. He is nothing but the scapegoat for those USF officials, past and present, who, in trying to guarantee the success of the basketball program at USF, instead created or perpetuated a rotten system that now lies dead.
JEFFERSON CRISWELL
Springfield, Va.

Sir:
Congratulations to Father Lo Schiavo for having the courage to make such a tough decision. He put his foot down and set an example all schools should follow, namely, that education is more important than athletics. Athletes of all ages will benefit from this example.
BILL GANLEY
Salem, N.H.

Sir:
While the facts of the early morning hours of Dec. 21 seem shadowed in doubt, the assault on the integrity of the University of San Francisco by arrogant alumni is clear. I hope Father Lo Schiavo's decision will stand as a precedent for other university presidents and as a warning to overenthusiastic, underhanded boosters.
BRUCE THOMAS
Berkeley, Calif.

Sir:
How a man with All-America status and popularity and with the world at his feet could stoop so low is beyond me. Quintin Dailey seems to destroy his claim to innocence in the article by contradicting himself. Just to cite one instance, Dailey says, on page 74, that he fell asleep at 2:30 a.m., while on the following page he says he fell asleep at 3:40. For someone who hadn't been drinking, that sure sounds like bad timing to me.
KENNETH W. LOWE
Salisbury, Md.

Sir:
There is no charge easier to make, and none more difficult to disprove, than that of sexual assault. In the absence of any physical evidence, and based on the facts as stated in your story, I have a reasonable doubt as to Quintin Dailey's guilt, notwithstanding his pleading guilty to a reduced charge. The plea was plainly a tactical decision to put the matter behind him and assure his entry into the professional ranks. For the final verdict on Dailey, we must wait to see what kind of life he chooses to lead as a professional.
MARK T. DYKSTRA
Attorney-at-Law
Auburn, Ind.

Sir:
With all the questions and issues raised in your account of the USF scandal, there are two subsidiary matters that I find very disconcerting: attorney Bob Woolf's cavalier, sexist statement, "Even if he was guilty of everything the lady said, it wasn't that bad"; and the ungrammatical, almost illiterate utterances of Quintin Dailey, who was reportedly a "good student" in high school and who has completed three years at a supposedly decent university.
VIRGINIA WOLFE MANUEL
Hinckley, N.Y.

Sir:
I disapprove of the contents of your article covering the demise of the USF basketball program. To publish testimony of a sexual assault "in considerable detail" in such a popular sports magazine as yours is simply wrong. According to Robert H. Boyle and Roger Jackson, these alleged events were recorded to "delineate the terrible nature of [Quintin] Dailey's assault, a crime for which he might not have been punished." The quality and purpose of the story would have been upheld without these details. You have a moral responsibility to your readers, especially the young ones who do not yet have the maturity to properly deal with such things.
BOB CORD
Anderson, S.C.

Sir:
Isn't All-America Quintin Dailey giving John Q. Public the "finger" in the opening picture? I, for one, don't hold magazines or books with my middle finger protruding in that direction.
BOB KUFFEL
Park Ridge, Ill.

•SI's photographer shot a large number of pictures of Dailey in his apartment, and in every pose in which he was holding a book, the position of his fingers was the same. SI concluded it was natural, not intentional.—ED.

TESTING FOR DRUGS
Sir:
Some of the statements made in Douglas S. Looney's article (A Test with Nothing but Tough Questions, Aug. 9) on the possible use of urinalysis to determine drug usage in the NFL left me sick to my stomach! How dare Players Association President Gene Upshaw say that urinalysis "is an insult to [the players'] integrity"? The only insult is to the integrity of the game! Almost daily I pick up the newspaper and see that another player has admitted to a "chemical dependency."

In the U.S. Air Force, spot checks by urinalysis for drug usage are mandatory to insure the integrity of our national defense system. As a member of the Air Force it has never occurred to me that my "rights of privacy" have been violated. As Greg Pruitt so aptly put it, "If you've got nothing to hide, why worry about urinalysis?"

Rather than worry about the tests, the players should worry about the image they project to our young people.
DAVID C. GREY
Sergeant, USAF
Omaha

Sir:
George Rogers, last year's leading rusher in the NFL, reportedly admitted to having spent $10,000 last year on cocaine. Rogers claims he was a recreational user of the substance. Well, that figure comes so close to my total take-home pay for 1981 it's revolting! That is an insult to my integrity and the integrity of every other sports fan who works his tail off just to see his favorite team once or twice a season, only to be rewarded by less than 100% performance because one or more players on the field abuse this drug or another.
GREG P. ZACHARY
Houston

Sir:
The vital question isn't so much who should do what about athletes who abuse drugs, but what constitutes abuse. Does urinalysis detect abusive levels as opposed to non-abusive? It appears that the article, indeed the entire controversy, assumes that the detection of a drug in an athlete's urine brands that athlete as an abuser. Perhaps the various leagues, players' associations and SI should address that question.
J. KURTIS WAHLBRINK
St. Louis

Sir:
The Legal Action Center is a not-for-profit public interest law firm that specializes in areas of law concerning the employment rights of current and former substance abusers. From our experience, we wish to make two points. First, although the most sophisticated urine tests are quite accurate, mistakes can happen. Urine samples can be mislabeled or switched, and occasionally the test reports a "false positive" even though, the subject took no drugs. It is thus unwise to conclude that a person abused a drug solely on the basis of a urinalysis without examining other evidence.

Second, current medical evidence indicates that alcohol and drug abuse are diseases that need treatment, and that many abusers are unable to stop without professional help. The primary goal of any urine testing of athletes should thus be to identify those persons in need of treatment, with the test results and treatment kept confidential to protect the individual's privacy and to encourage others to come forward for help.

Abuse of drugs and alcohol is one of the gravest health problems in this country. We applaud your efforts to focus public attention on the seriousness of this issue and on the urgent need for providing treatment opportunities to those suffering from substance abuse.
PAUL N. SAMUELS
Staff Attorney
Legal Action Center
New York City

BRAVE WORDS
Sir:
Your article about America's Team II (Not Home Free Yet, Aug. 9) perfectly expressed how I feel about the Atlanta Braves and Ted Turner's SuperStation WTBS. Before WTBS, the only time I could see a game was on weekends or on Monday night. Now I can watch almost every game the Braves play.
BILLY OSBORNE
Aiken, S.C.

Sir:
I am an objective yet dedicated Dallas Cowboy fan. I also have a great deal of respect for the Atlanta Braves, but you do not become America's Team—I or II—without winning year in and year out. The Braves just lost 11 straight games! When was the last time the Cowboys did that?
CARL NAVE
Roanoke, Va.

Sir:
You must be kidding! The Atlanta Braves as America's Team? I believe you owe the Dallas Cowboys an engraved apology.
WARREN BERRY
Seminole, Okla.

Sir:
Everyone knows the Los Angeles Dodgers are America's Team.
JEROME H. WEYMOUTH
Downey, Calif.

GLASSIC WARFARE
Sir:
Your article (He Blocked for Napoleon, Aug. 9) on Denver Guard Tom Glassic was terrific. I am one of the thousands of Napoleonic enthusiasts across the country, and it's nice to know that professional athletes are included in our ranks. I hope that all of the "weekend generals" across the country derive as much pleasure from their miniature war games as Glassic seems to. As I assume my role of Lieut. General Edler von Lecoq, commander of the two Saxon divisions of the French VII Corps in 1812, I send to Tom a hearty Vive l'Empereur!"
SCOTT SILVERS
Kansas City, Mo.

Sir:
Occasionally I thumb through my husband's copy of SI looking for well-written articles that will appeal to my non-athletic interests. I was delighted when I found He Blocked for Napoleon. Bob Ottum did a superb job of describing Tom Glassic, a truly one-of-a-kind person. When the Broncos are next on television, even I will perk up to watch mind and brawn work together.
JANET H. GOING
Lewisville, N.C.

Sir:
Rape is never a laughing matter. The boorish, sadistic reference by Tom Glassic to a mock attack on a convent by "General Peter Rapenunovich" not only lacks humor but also is insulting, if not blasphemous. And the fact that it appeared in the same issue as the detailed description of the horrendous, traumatic assault by Quintin Dailey dramatizes the un-funniness of such a crime. Let's not desensitize a single reader about its seriousness.
THE REV. HERB WELLMEIER
Cathedral of St. John the Baptist
Savannah

DODO
Sir:
Thanks for your article on Dodo Cheney (A Dodo in Name Only, Aug. 9). I couldn't help but smile and remember fondly the hundreds of Saturdays I spent playing tennis as a member of the Santa Monica (Calif.) Teen Tennis Association. I'm glad to read that Dodo is still a vibrant part of the game.
MARTHA A-H FOX
Lexington, Va.

Sir:
I grew up in La Jolla, Calif. and vividly recall Dodo Cheney's domination of the tennis championships there. She was, and always will be, one of the classiest individuals to grace the sport. Those who have been lucky enough to see her play and those fortunate enough to be honored by her acquaintance will never forget her. Thanks to Jill Lieber for a fine profile of a very special lady.
JOHN HERNANDEZ
La Palma, Calif.

SYNCING
Sir:
I was thrilled to read the article That Syncing Feeling (Aug. 2) by Demmie Stathoplos on synchronized swimming. The sport has come a long way since 1967, when I was Michigan's AAU individual winner representing the Lansing Sea Sprites. I can only dream of what it would have been like to travel outside the U.S. for meets, get a full athletic scholarship to college, appear in SI and, ultimately, go to the Olympic Games. I'll be cheering for the U.S. duo—probably Candy Costie and Tracie Ruiz—in the '84 Games and for synchronized swimming itself. I feel the solo and team events should be included in the Olympics, too.
PAMELA M. MILLER
East Lansing, Mich.

Sir:
I found the opening photo of Tracie Ruiz and Candy Costie offensive. There are so many more attractive phases of this beautiful water ballet, even in the inverted positions.

Also, publicity given to Ruiz and Costie in recent publications has shown neglect for the many hardworking and dedicated team members who have sacrificed to make this an event worthy of the Olympic Games.
JOHN ALLEN
1960 Olympic Walker (50 km.)
Colorado Springs, Colo.

Sir:
I propose Tracie Ruiz for Sportswoman of the Year, based on her gold medal solo performance at the world championships in Ecuador, and for cover girl of your annual swim-suit issue. Only one word can describe my reaction to her photo in the Aug. 2 issue: Wow!
HENRY LEWIS
Pittsburgh

Sir:
Tracie Ruiz and Candy Costie? I'm in love.
CARL R. WARNER
Dallas

Letters should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and be addressed to The Editor, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)