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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Nov. 15, 1982
Nov. 15, 1982

Table of Contents
Nov. 15, 1982

College Football
Ray Leonard
Rick Mears

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Edited by Gay Flood

THE CARDS' SERIES
Sir:
I can't remember ever reading a more enjoyable, more descriptive or more humorous article on a World Series than Ron Fimrite's piece on the sixth and seventh games between St. Louis and Milwaukee (For All You Do, This Hug's for You, Nov. 1). Fimrite is to be congratulated on his warm insight into the proceedings.
JOHN ALLEN
Pasadena, Calif.

This is an article from the Nov. 15, 1982 issue Original Layout

Sir:
Congratulations on your World Series coverage by Steve Wulf and Ron Fimrite. I have one complaint, though. I know the pro basketball season is starting, but Moses Malone on the Nov. 1 cover? Pitiful. I've been a St. Louis Cardinal fan for 22 years and was looking forward to seeing the best team in baseball featured there. Let's give credit where it's due.
MICHAEL FLORENT
Springfield, Ill.

Sir:
As I recall, in your baseball preview issue (April 12) you picked St. Louis to finish fourth in the National League East, behind the New York Mets. I believe you owe the world champion Cardinals an apology.
JAMES S. REED
St. Louis

NEW KID IN PHILLY
Sir:
Your Nov. 1 cover, with Moses Malone standing there ready to bring the NBA title to Philly where it belongs, is just awesome.
JEFF NEUHAUSER
Canal Fulton, Ohio

Sir:
Manny Millan's cover photograph of Moses Malone caught my interest, and I'd like to know if Malone was actually there with all of those people when the photo was taken, or was the cover actually two pictures in one? My judgment is that Moses was superimposed onto the background. If it was only one photo, where was it taken?
DREW J. KUNKEL
University Park, Pa.

Sir:
My son says your cover photo of Malone was taken in Philadelphia. I say it doesn't look like a Philly crowd. Who's right?
THOMAS C. DUDDY
Philadelphia

•The picture was taken on the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Millan brought Moses there on Oct. 10 to pose alone for the cover. However, they discovered that it was a Super Sunday in Philly, one of the several Sundays during the year on which the museum, the Franklin Institute and the Academy of Natural Sciences, institutions located along the city's Benjamin Franklin Parkway, sponsor a festival, complete with booths, food and entertainment, for the enjoyment of the public. Some of the festivalgoers thronging the area in front of the museum decided that they would pose for SI's cover photo, too.—ED.

Sir:
Malone has the name of Moses and the patience of Job. But in the picture on the Nov. 1 cover, I see a blue-eyed blond seemingly about to take a big bite out of the $13.2 million man. What else will Malone have to endure to reach the Promised Land?
KENNETH N. KASHNER
Kinsman, Ohio

TRAIL-BLAZING COACH
Sir:
As a St. Joseph's graduate—we are a university now—I share the enthusiasm John Papanek expressed in his tribute to Portland Trail Blazer Coach Jack Ramsay (A Man Who Never Lets Down, Nov. 1). Dr. Jack became a symbol of excellence for all students at St. Joseph's during his 11 years there. He was able to compete both intellectually and athletically with those from better-known and more prestigious schools. I'm indebted to you for paying tribute to a man who truly represents excellence in all aspects of life.
EDWARD P. GAVIGAN
Upper Marlboro, Md.

THE MUSTANGS
Sir:
I was thrilled to open the Nov. 1 issue and see Southern Methodist Tailback Eric Dickerson breaking loose on one of his long gains (Mustangs on a Stampede, Nov. 1). SMU has struggled through some lean years. Then last season was like shooting a hole in one when you're playing golf by yourself. The Mustangs were 10-1, but no one seemed to know it—probably because SMU was on NCAA probation and couldn't go to a bowl or appear on national TV. The simple fact is that the Mustangs are one of the best teams in the country. So thanks to John Papanek for an entertaining article, and to SI for some long awaited recognition.
CURT STUBBS
Peoria, Ill.

Sir:
John Papanek's last paragraph was perfect. Just once, I'd like a University of Texas coach to admit that his team was beaten by a better one. SMU was the better team, and, in my opinion, Eric Dickerson tippy-toed through Texas' defense pretty well.
BOB BOEKER
Sherman, Texas

Sir:
I thought the article was a little biased in favor of SMU. Granted, the Mustangs were the No. 4 team in the nation, yet the facts of their game with Texas were not explored in detail. Take Eric Dickerson's rushing statistics: 19 carries for 118 yards. One carry covered 60 yards, but his other 18 were good for only 58 yards, a 3.2-yard average. This was the same Dickerson who had exploded for 241 yards against Houston the previous week. Any collegiate running back can run 60 yards when the blocks are right, but what about the blocks on those other 18 carries? And Craig James had 17 carries for only 57 yards (3.3 yards a crack). For a supposedly fantastic pair of running backs who planned to wear down the relatively young Texas defense by alternating offensive series, they sure didn't look all that good. I can't wait to read your articles on SMU's loss to Arkansas—and Arkansas' loss to Texas. Hook 'em. Horns!
DANIEL J. RODRIGUEZ
Austin, Texas

MARATHONERS
Sir:
As one of those fortunate enough to have competed in this year's New York City Marathon (They Grappled in the Big Apple, Nov. 1), I have two recommendations for your Sportsman of the Year award: first, Alberto Salazar for his world record and 4-for-4 mark in the marathon and, second, Fred Lebow for creating, developing and managing an event with more than 14,000 participants and more than two million live spectators. The organizational effort that drives the New York Marathon is close to perfect, and the entire sport owes Lebow a debt of gratitude.
PAUL RUDOVSKY
Alexandria, Va.

Sir:
I admit that the Boston and New York City marathons are two of sport's biggest thrills of the year, but I disagree with any suggestion that New York's is the premier race of the two. The field at New York may be star-studded and the times relatively better than they are in other marathons, but those facts don't make up for the race's faults. The biggest one of this year's extravaganza was the cloud of dust that left runner-up Rodolfo Gomez wondering where Alberto Salazar, the man he was pursuing, had gone.
DICK DAWSON
Durham, N.H.

Sir:
I think Craig Neff's article on the New York City Marathon was excellent writing, but I also think it missed the point: Anyone who finishes a marathon is a winner. In fact, those who finished after the four-hour mark may be the real winners. Many of them looked as though they'd spent a good part of their lives behind desks and steering wheels. Women's thighs jiggled and men's bellies bounced but, by God, they ran 26.2 miles! It was wonderful to see all those ordinary people do such an extraordinary thing. It was an exhilarating testament to man's potential.
SUZANNE ROODMAN
New Rochelle, N.Y.

Sir:
I recall that after the 1981 New York race Kenny Moore, in his essay on moments to remember in your special The Year in Sports issue (Feb. 10), said that he wouldn't cover the next one and would probably be off on a long run somewhere in Oregon. I see that he didn't cover the marathon. I wonder if the second part of his statement was also true.
ROSS BRAY
New Haven, Conn.

•Far from it. Moore was off on a long assignment that took him to Brisbane, Australia (Crowned on Coronation Drive, Oct. 18), Vicenza, Italy and Coventry, England. The stories from those last two stops will appear in SI soon.—ED.

JIM THORPE (CONT.)
Sir:
Your Jim Thorpe story (The Regilding of a Legend, Oct. 25) was expertly done. However, there was one mistake I think I should point out. I am quoted as saying that Oklahoma Governor William H. Murray double-crossed us by vetoing the $25,000 appropriation for a Thorpe memorial.

It was Governor Johnston Murray, son of the first Governor Murray, who vetoed the bill in 1953. William H. Murray served as governor in the early 1930s and acted with great courage during his four-year term in the Depression era. I hope this small correction can be made, because William H. Murray was a distinguished and honest Oklahoman.
ROSS U. PORTER
Shawnee, Okla.

Sir:
You noted that Jim Thorpe had a twin brother, Charles. What became of him?
FRANK MANNING
Houston

•Charles Thorpe, who was less robust than his fraternal twin, Jim, died of pneumonia at the age of eight.—ED.

Letters should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and be addressed to The Editor, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.