Inside Slant On The Colleges

Douglas S. Looney gives the skinny on everything from booster clubs to coaches who are in trouble to the 28 first-round picks in the 1985 NFL draft
September 04, 1984

IF YOU WANT YOUR OFFICIAL TIGER PAWS, AND TWO SEATS ON THE 45, GIVE US YOUR GOLD CARD

Wealthy and not so wealthy alums fuel college football programs through booster clubs. For their contributions, boosters can get such things as choice seats for home games, invites to the coach's weekly breakfast, trips to road games. Each club swears, of course, that it spends its money legally, but it's not so sure about the other guys. Because everybody counts differently, nobody really knows how much booster money is collected each year. Best guesses for the top three:

1) Clemson: $5 million-plus from 16,000 people. 2) North Carolina: $5 million from 7,000. 3) Texas A&M: $3.05 million from 3,250.

SORRY GUYS

Three players who deserve the Heisman at least as much as Bo Jackson but have no chance of get-ting it because they're not offensive backs: 1) Pitt tackle Bill Fralic. The best pure player in college this year; 2) Texas safety Jerry Gray. Puts on a clinic every Saturday afternoon; 3) Southern Cal linebacker Jack Del Rio. A big, big hitter with a big-city personality and an All-Pro by 1986.

TALKING ABOUT COACHES

Best coaches: 1) Don James, Washington. 2) Don James, Washington. 3) Don James, Washington.

Coaches who had better win now: 1) Gerry Faust, Notre Dame. He knows his time has come but believes he can see the light at the end of the tunnel. 2) Barry Switzer, Oklahoma. May be the winningest active coach in the nation (106-21-3), but he hasn't done anything for the Sooners lately except get his name in the papers for questionable business practices and being charged with DWI. 3) Earle Bruce, Ohio State. His cold personality ticks off Buckeye followers, but, luckily for him, he'll have big talent on the field this fall.

Most underrated coaches: 1) Jim Walden, Washington State. Somehow gets average players or worse to play far above their heads. 2) John Cooper, Tulsa. Works miracles (18-4 over the last two years) and nobody cares.

Coaches who'll be head coaches in the pros by 1990: USC's Ted Tollner, Illinois's Mike White, Pitt's Foge Fazio, Texas A&M's Jackie Sherrill, South Carolina's Joe Morrison.

Most significant coaching change: Jimmy Johnson from Oklahoma State to Miami. Hurricane fans will find a national title is a fleeting thing and blame the demise on Johnson.

Most insignificant coaching change: Lou Holtz from Arkansas to Minnesota. No coach will win again, ever, at Minnesota, where losing is a tradition (1-10 in 1983) carved in ice.

Best coaching jobs: 1) Notre Dame. The money isn't great ($50,000 plus $20,000 for a TV show, and the usual perks, like a car), but you have the advantage of having an entire nation help coach your team. 2) USC ($80,000-plus). There's a talent over load every year, but the fans usually OD on sunshine and seldom get vicious. They will, however, write snide letters to the Los Angeles Times.

TALKING ABOUT FANS
Rowdiest: LSU's. All-day warmup with booze and smoke has its effect By 7 p.m. kickoff, delirium is full throat. Will boo the invocation. Dirtiest: Florida's. Should wash out fans' mouths with soap at stadium entrances. Classiest: Nebraska's. They love football, travel anywhere, and lose with grace.

CRUMMIEST GAME OF THE YEAR
UCLA vs. Long Beach State on Sept. 15. Will whoever scheduled this turkey please stand up and accept the ridicule you deserve?

BEST AND WORST

Best town: Austin, Texas—and not only because you can good-time it at the Scholz Garten. If you don't like Austin, you're a sad case.

Worst towns: 1) Pullman, Wash., home of Washington State. To party, students must drive 10 miles to Moscow, Idaho. 2) Moscow, Idaho.

Best band: the Longhorns'. Best town, best band? Of course. The band must be sensational or else the folks in charge wouldn't have spent $70,000 last season to airlift its 325 members to Auburn for five minutes of half time toot in'.

Worst band: (Tie) Rice's, Stanford's, Harvard's. Shame on you all.

Best cheer leaders: Missouri's. Oh, my.

Worst cheer leaders: Texas A&M's. All guys.

Prettiest campus: West Point. Being alongside the Hudson on a sunny fall afternoon with the leaves turning and the Cadets on parade tops all.

Ugliest campus: Texas Tech's. Looks as if they should cancel classes and convert the school into a prison.

Worst idea ever thought of by a coach: When Ted Tollner took over at USC in 1983, he said he wanted to get the Trojans out of their black shoes and put them in—yes, Sweetie—red ones. The idea died of silence.

Best-looking uniforms: UCLA's home attire. Its elegant blue and gold bespeaks Southern California tasteful-ness, often a contradiction in terms.

Worst-looking uniforms: Penn State's all-white road togs. They look like practice outfits.

BIG BUCKS

Last season the 16 bowls for the big schools shelled out $33.5 million to the competing teams, $6.2 million more than the previous season. These eight paid the most:

Rose—$5.6 million per team
Cotton—$1.85 million
Orange—$1.84 million
Sugar—$1.8 million
Fiesta—$817,000
Gator—$679,000
Liberty—$574,000
Citrus—$500,000

FIVE HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS WHO CAN TAKE THE COLLEGE CHEERLEADER OF THEIR CHOICE TO THE HIGH SCHOOL PROM

Joe Terranova, 43, of Dearborn, Mich., a car-company exec by day and football fanatic by night, knows better than anyone the names of the best high school football players. That's why the best college coaches know Terranova's phone number by heart. Here are the five hottest schoolboy seniors, according to Terranova.

1) Quarterback Dave Schnell, Elkhart, Ind., 6'3", 204 pounds, 4.8 for the 40. Pure drop-back passer, a Mark Herrmann reincarnate.

2) Running back Brian Davis, Washington, Pa., 5'11", 198, 4.5. Better than Tony Dorsett at same stage.

3) Running back D'Juan Francisco, Moeller High, Cincinnati, 5'11", 185, 4.4. Tough, fast and ornery.

4) Running back Sammie Smith, Apopka, Fla., 6'2", 205, 4.5. Premier runner in Florida, where great high school backs are commonplace.

5) Offensive lineman Ed Monaghan, Drexel Hill, Pa., 6'3", 260, 4.9. No doubts. A college All-America.

DEAR NFL SCOUTS: READ THIS LIST OF '85 FIRST-ROUND DRAFT PICKS AND YOU WON'T HAVE TO GO TO THE BLUE-GRAY GAME

George Adams, RB, Kentucky
Greg Allen, RB, Florida State
Mark Behning, OT, Nebraska
Lomas Brown, OT, Florida
Ray Childress, DT, Texas A&M
Jack Del Rio, LB, USC
Bill Fralic, OT, Pitt
Owen Gill, RB, Iowa
Jerry Gray, DB, Texas
Danny Greene, WR, Washington
Ron Holmes, DT, Washington
Ethan Horton, RB, N. Carolina
Dwayne Jiles, LB, Texas Tech
Richard Johnson, DB, Wisconsin
Mike Kelley, C, Notre Dame
Emanuel King, LB, Alabama
Chuck Long, QB, Iowa
Mark MacDonald, OT, BC
Keli McGregor, TE, Colorado State
Micah Moon, LB, N. Carolina
Ricky Moore, FB, Alabama
Kevin Murphy, DE, Oklahoma
Greg Naron, OG, N. Carolina
Jerry Rice, WR, Mississippi Valley State
Bruce Smith, DT, Virginia Tech
Alvin Toles, LB, Tennessee
Al Toon, WR, Wisconsin
Luis Zendejas, K, Arizona State

On balance, not a great group. Especially slim pickings at quarterback and running back. "But," says Tony Razzano, director of college scouting for the San Francisco 49ers, "at the least, you could win the USFL with 'em."

WHEN THESE GUYS TALK, E. F. HUTTON LISTENS

The best recruiters:

1) Jerry Pettibone, Texas A&M. Has developed schmoozing with players and parents into an art.

2) Artie Gigantino, USC. His warmth is contagious.

3) Barry Gallup, Boston College. Has the fastest growing rep.

4) Bill Rees, UCLA. Knows how to hustle stars, a talent that should be in great evidence this fall.

THE LEAST THEY SHOULD DO IS NAME A BUILDING AFTER HIM

Certainly no undergrad has generated more cold cash for his school than Boston College's Money Machine, senior quarterback Doug Flutie. Get out your calculators.

In the three years before Flutie, BC won only 13 of 36 games and had an average home attendance of 23,542. With Flutie, the Eagles have gone 21-10-1 (he didn't play the first three games of his freshman year) and averaged 32,080 fans per home game. At $13 a ticket, Flutie has meant an extra $1.89 million at the box office.

The school's only TV appearances in the three years before Flutie were two regional telecasts, against Massachusetts in 1979 and Pitt in 1980. Net profit: $380,000. With Flutie, BC has appeared on regional, national cable or national network TV 10 times. In 1983 TV paid BC a whopping $1,585,000 for four games, putting BC fourth in the nation in TV take.

As for bowls, pre-Flutie BC hadn't played a postseason game in 40 years. With Flutie, BC went to the Tangerine in 1982 and to the Liberty in '83. The Eagles' total take from those two games was $1.05 million.

This fall? Because of Flutie, BC will be on national TV at least three times and regional TV three or four times. Total haul: an estimated $1.35 million. Also, season-ticket sales are up 24%, and home attendance is expected to average better than 42,000. Further, BC should again be bowlbound at the end of the season.

The bottom line: By his graduation, Flutie will have put somewhere between $6.53 million and $8.18 million into Boston College's coffers. And you thought one person couldn't make a difference.

PHOTODel Rio of USC. PHOTOFaust needs a fast turnaround. TWO PHOTOSStanford's horns; A&M's cheerleaders. PHOTOThe Bruins' home blue. TWO PHOTOSTerranova and Schnell.
PHOTOFlutie Towers?

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)