19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

January 07, 1985

BETTER LATE...
Sir:
I finally finished your extensive special Olympic preview issue (July 18). Good job.
RICHARD ALEC KIRCHNER
Gainesville, Fla.

SPORTSMAN, SPORTSWOMAN
Sir:
The SI Sportswoman of the Year (Dec. 24-31) was a good choice, but the selection of Edwin Moses as the Sportsman was not. Moses is great at what he does, but he achieved his victories over a period of years, and there are men who outperformed him in 1984. The Rams' Eric Dickerson should have gotten the award. He broke a record that had stood for 11 years, and he's only the second NFL player to have rushed 2,000 yards in a single season. I was a running back in high school, and I know how hard each yard comes.
PATRICK MINGARELLI
Buffalo

Sir:
If there is any dispute about Edwin Moses's selection as Sportsman of the Year, just check the man's record. In the past seven years there hasn't been a more successful athlete worldwide. Year after year Moses is put to the test, and he never loses. Wayne Gretzky can't say that. Neither can Larry Bird, nor even Carl Lewis.
VINCENT DALEY
Chicago

Sir:
I agree with your selection of Edwin Moses as Sportsman of the Year. However, Walter Payton should have shared the honor because of the valiant effort he displayed during the 1984 season when he broke Jim Brown's longstanding NFL career rushing record. I do not mean to take anything away from Mary Lou Retton's accomplishments in the Summer Games. She unquestionably is an amazing and talented athlete. Walter Payton, however, is more deserving of the award.
JONATHAN NIEMEYER
Brentwood, Tenn.

Sir:
You guys blew it! Oh, sure, I was excited about the Olympics, too! Mary Lou Retton and Edwin Moses (or, for that matter, Greg Louganis, Carl Lewis and many other fine U.S. athletes) are excellent choices, but the choice should have been the woman who has dominated her sport for three straight years and won practically every match she entered. Yes, gentlemen, Retton and Moses are good, but Martina Navratilova is truly incredible. She should have been the Sportswoman of the Year.
JEFFREY L. YORK
Chicago

Sir:
They are deserving champions in a year that also featured Carl Lewis winning four Olympic gold medals, Doug Flutie's amazing exploits on the football field and Martina Navratilova's impressive dominance of women's tennis.

There is, however, a wondrous athlete your selectors overlooked, whose exploits in 1984 are unique in the annals of sport: John Henry, at the age of nine, winning the Arlington Million and several other major stakes races. And he won his races in most convincing fashion, putting on powerful stretch drives to defeat proud, tough horses many years his junior. For Moses and Retton to equal John Henry's performance in 1984, they would have to win Olympic gold medals again sometime around the turn of the century.
GEORGE MOSS
El Cerrito, Calif.

MA$$$$COT$
Sir:
After reading the item on the new four-year, $230,000 contract of the Phoenix Suns' mascot (SCORECARD, Dec. 24-31), I wonder if we won't see a giant increase in the number of college underclassmen who apply for the NBA's hardship draft for mascots.
DOUG GOLLAN
South Salem, N.Y.

NAME CZECH
Sir:
I suggest that Frank Deford check his Slavic language usage (Done In Down Under, Dec. 17). Only the a is added to change the masculine name to feminine. For example, Sukov/Sukova; Navratilov/Navratilova; Mandlikov/Mandlikova.
ROBERT P. HILTON SR.
Alexandria, Va.

•The "ova" is the common Czech suffix denoting female gender: Helena Sukova's father is Cyril Suk.—ED.

HONOR
Sir:
My thanks to Robert Sullivan for his fair and accurate article (Acquitted But Still On Trial At Virginia, Dec. 24-31). As a graduate of the University of Virginia, I am committed to the ideals of its honor system. As a fan of the Virginia basketball team and coach Terry Holland, I am also committed to the basketball program. Olden Polynice was tried, as any other student would have been, and therefore is entitled to be presumed innocent following his acquittal. Criticism should be focused not upon Polynice or Holland, but instead upon the honor system standards that made possible such an acquittal and also upon the individual who saw fit to breach the confidentiality of the proceeding. Criticism is appropriate, and your article should help to direct it appropriately.
RUSSELL O. SLAYTON, JR.
Lawrenceville, Va.

Sir:
In an episode that has made me question the ethics of all involved—the player who plagiarized, the trial participant who broke the confidentiality pledge and the fans who snubbed the player in the name of "honor"—I was glad to find that at SPORTS ILLUSTRATED honorable does not mean hypocritical. Olden Polynice is getting what systems of honor and justice are supposed to ensure: a second chance for those who deserve one.
DEONA HOUFF
Mount Sidney, Va.

Sir:
As a former cadet at VMI during and after World War II, it is reassuring to know that one institution has not compromised its principals or modified its definition of the word "honor."

I can assure you that even if Olden Polynice had been 7'11" and averaging 45 points and 25 rebounds per game, were he a student at VMI, the honor court at that institution would have sent him packing.

If the purpose of Robert Sullivan's article is to inform your readers that UVa's honor code is a sham, he has accomplished that objective.
WILLIAM G. HAUGHTON
Atlanta, Ga.

TOO ROUGH OR JUST HARD-NOSED?
Sir:
In E.M. Swift's article on hockey's Hunter brothers (Rough Chips Off The Old Block, Dec. 10), their father complained that it is wrong to play for fun. Nonsense! Not every kid who competes in sports is going to become a star athlete. For every star created by the "win-at-all-costs" system, there are plenty of other kids who lose interest in sports for life. The win-at-all-costs attitude is also what got Darryl Stingley paralyzed.

Today's kids have enough pressures on them. When they compete in sports, it should be for fun.
GARY OREM
Baltimore

Sir:
Having just read the article on the Hunter brothers, I am left with a nagging question: If being a farmer's son is justification for what amounts to felonious assault with a hockey stick, what unsportsmanlike mayhem can a suburban boy like me (my father sells cars) get away with and still be excused by your magazine as being just "hard-nosed"?
DANN WULF

TRIBUTE TO MANOLETE
Sir:
In 26 years as an SI subscriber I have never read anything as moving as Gilbert Roland's ode to Manolete (NOSTALGIA, Dec. 10). I knew the story of Manolete; now I feel I know the man. Pundonor, as described by Roland and exemplified by the bullfighter, is not an easy quality to find nowadays; yet, as the author says, a man is nothing without it. My thanks for printing this touching piece written by one great man in honor of another.

One request: Please translate the Spanish inscription on the gold ring.
ROY C. HARRIS
Carrollton, Texas

•It says, "My son, don't worry, don't be frightened."—ED.

NOT PILLS
Sir:
I was very glad to see an article on what I believe is the most demanding, affordable motor sport in the world, Supercross (FLYING BIKES AND WEALTHY TYKES, Nov. 12). I am a 28-year-old bank examiner for the state of Texas and have been riding dirt bikes with family and friends for half my life. This widely read article will no doubt contribute to the growth of the sport. However, one apparent misprint could set the sport back many years. The sentence in question read, "In what other sport could you find motorcycles flying beneath the peristyle of the Coliseum and completing a Carl Lewis-style long jump to the stadium floor while 62,699 sudsed-up whackozoids scream for more noise, dirt and pills?" I hope that the intended word was "spills," not "pills."
JOSEPH C. KIRKLIN
Houston

•The intended word was "spills."—ED.

STREAM OF GAMES
Sir:
To illustrate the difficulty in ranking college football teams, consider this string of games pairing common opponents, in which Boston College is the first winner and the last loser. If Boston College is capable of beating itself, as it would seem from the pairings, then playoffs must be the only valid means of establishing a No. 1.
JEFFREY HOGAN
New Vernon, N.J.

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Letters should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and be addressed to The Editor, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

Boston College

38

Alabama

6

Penn St

15

Rutgers

19

Syracuse

17

Nebraska

62

Kansas St

24

Kansas

28

Oklahoma

42

Pittsburgh

21

Tulane

35

Southern Miss

13

Alabama

31

Penn St

0

Rutgers

12

Syracuse

0

Nebraska

9

Kansas St

14

Kansas

7

Oklahoma

11

Pittsburgh

10

Tulane

10

Southern Miss

7

Mississippi

10

Mississippi

22

Memphis St

17

Florida St

38

Miami

20

Auburn

60

Cincinnati

40

Louisville

30

Houston

29

Texas

13

SMU

38

UNLV

30

San Jose St

33

California

19

Arizona St

28

Stanford

34

Illinois

34

Purdue

23

Notre Dame

30

LSU

21

Florida

43

Tennessee

24

Army

24

Air Force

52

Memphis St

6

Florida St

17

Miami

3

Auburn

18

Cincinnati

0

Louisville

21

Houston

28

Texas

15

SMU

7

UNLV

21

San Jose St

15

California

18

Arizona St

14

Stanford

10

Illinois

19

Purdue

20

Notre Dame

21

LSU

22

Florida

21

Tennessee

30

Army

24

Air Force

12

Colorado St

10

Colorado St

59

UTEP

35

Wyoming

59

New Mexico

29

Texas Tech

30

Texas A&M

35

TCU

32

Arkansas

33

Navy

38

So Carolina

17

Georgia

62

Vanderbilt

23

Maryland

41

Clemson

55

Virginia

26

Virginia Tech

38

Wm & Mary

23

Delaware

34

Temple

19

West Va

21

UTEP

31

Wyoming

22

New Mexico

21

Texas Tech

24

Texas A&M

12

TCU

21

Arkansas

31

Navy

10

So Carolina

21

Georgia

10

Vanderbilt

35

Maryland

14

Clemson

23

Virginia

0

Virginia Tech

23

Wm & Mary

14

Delaware

21

Temple

19

West Va

17

Boston College

20

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)