19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

July 07, 1985

ANDY AND T.C.
Sir:
Being from Wisconsin, I always pull for Andy North, and I know of all the setbacks he has suffered during his career. It was good to see him win the U.S. Open again (A Blast From The Past, June 24). However, I was impressed with T.C. Chen. He gave the crowds at Oakland Hills plenty of thrills. He played well, and he attacked the course from the outset. He never backed off. Although his last gamble cost him the tournament, he should be complimented for his play. I know that when I watch golf I prefer to see the leader continue to push the course, rather than coast along or play scared.
DAVID ZEBROWSKI
Milwaukee

Sir:
T.C. Chen took it on the chin not only in the U.S. Open, but also in SI. Why you showed photos of the one hole out of 72 that he played poorly is beyond me. Chen can hold his chin high for his remarkable play, and you should have chipped in more evidence to confirm that fact.
PAUL R. MEYER
Bloomington, Ill.

Sir:
We need not ever again wonder what T.C. stands for in T.C. Chen's name. It means two chips—Two Chips Chen.
KEVIN G. GOUGH
Bellevue, Wash.

•Chen's initials really stand for Tze-Chung.—ED.

HIGHS AND LOWS
Sir:
Bruce Newman's article (A Taste Of High Society, June 24) on Manute Bol was as delightful as the world would be if everyone were to say, as he does of his height. "You don't have to bother yourself, because God give it to you. I don't get mad." Thanks for the introduction to one more person who makes us realize that sport—and life—are to enjoy.
GARY L. ELLENBOLT
Hudson, Wis.

Sir:
Thanks for the article on the Rhode Island Gulls of the USBL. It's great that there is a summer league for soon-to-be NBA players to practice in. I especially liked the photograph showing Manute Bol towering over Anthony (Spud) Webb. I live in Raleigh, right next to N.C. State, and even though I am a die-hard UNC fan, I am also a Spud Webb fan. Good luck to Spud, Manute and all the other NBA rookies next season.
MIKE RAKOUSKAS JR.
Raleigh, N.C.

Sir:
I am sick of the USFL, and when I read your article on the USBL (Undeniably Sorry Basketball League) I nearly flipped. There is a season for every sport, and these leagues are trying to ruin that idea. The thing that really gets me is that they call themselves pro—I call them reject.
BILL FE
Falls Church, Va.

THE SWEDES
Sir:
Congratulations on Curry Kirkpatrick's timely and insightful article on the highly successful Swedish junior tennis program (New Breed From The North, June 24). An oft-mentioned characteristic of the Swedish stars is their good sportsmanship, politeness and "inner peace" on the court. Also often raised is the question of why many American players lack these same qualities.

The positive attitude of the Swedes is sometimes attributed to the stoic nature of the people. Another possible explanation may be their reason for playing the sport. Their motivations are more performance-oriented—they work hard to play to the best of their ability, regardless of the opponent, tournament or score. With improved performance come positive results. American youngsters, on the other hand, are taught to win, and in some cases to win at all costs. This supercompetitiveness breeds success but at the expense of sportsmanship and perspective on the game as a whole.

Maybe we Americans need to reevaluate our motivations for participation in sport.
KYLE TONG
Holden, Mass.

BILLY CONN (CONT.)
Sir:
I would like you to know how much I enjoyed Frank Deford's story on my father, Billy Conn (The Boxer And The Blonde, June 17). I felt it was a masterpiece.

Nobody over the years has read more stories about my father than I have—many wonderful articles by many great writers, from Grantland Rice to Jimmy Cannon and all the rest. None ever approached The Boxer And The Blonde. The way Deford was able to capture the era, the city of Pittsburgh, my father's career and, most important, the relationship between my parents was sheer brilliance.

We were certainly fortunate to have a talented writer like Deford tell this story the way it deserved to be told. Many thanks.
TIM CONN
Pittsburgh

RECALLING BOB PRINCE
Sir:
When you are eight years old and stuck out in the garden weeding corn on a hot summer day, nothing provides much relief, but the late Bob Prince (SCORECARD, June 24) made that chore a little bit easier for me. Pirate baseball was the main source of entertainment when I was growing up on our farm outside Pittsburgh. We kids used to trail after the tractor, carrying the radio for my father and yelling, "And you can kiss it goodby!" along with the Gunner every time a Pirate home run was hit.

I live in the Midwest now, and I had to call home to get some sympathy. I feel sorry for anyone who never got to hear Prince—I haven't listened to a baseball game on the radio since he was fired in 1975. I cheer for a different team now, but I'll never forget the Gunner. I was happy to see that SI hasn't forgotten him either.
JULIE ROYER
Milwaukee

INSTANT SUCCESS
Sir:
Regarding the article on jigs by Robert H. Boyle (ON THE SCENE, June 17), I'm impressed! I have been bass fishing for about five years and have never had anything work so well as the bucktail jig. I had read many articles, watched numerous fishing programs and tried every artificial bass lure known to man, except the bucktail jig. After reading Boyle's piece, I immediately went out and bought a variety of jigs. And wouldn't you know, as I was "conducting the orchestra," I nailed my first legal-sized, feisty largemouth bass (16 inches, 3 pounds). I was thrilled. My husband was stunned—as were all the other fishermen, who came in fishless. Keep them fishin' articles comin', and thanks!
MARI E. PETERSON
Export, Pa.

CHANGE OF NAME
Sir:
I'd like your readers to know that Sharon Walsh, one of your "no-names" in tennis (Hana Is Getting It All Together, May 20), has won the U.S. Juniors twice (1969-70), the Wimbledon Junior title (1970) and has represented the U.S. four times in Federation Cup play. She has won more than 50 singles and doubles titles in her 14-year pro career, including the Bridgestone World Doubles with Billie Jean King (Tokyo, 1983). She was a member of two victorious U.S. Wightman Cup teams (London, 1982 and '84) and was ranked with partner Barbara Potter as the No. 2 doubles team in the U.S. for 1984.

On April 20 I married Sharon Walsh. Her no-name for your non-files is now Sharon Walsh-Pete.
MICHAEL PETE
San Rafael, Calif.

•On May 31, Walsh-Pete—along with Kathy Jordan, Zina Garrison and Potter—was named to the 1985 U.S. Federation Cup team. When Pete learned of his wife's selection, he contacted SI to add to his letter. He also "called friends and neighbors and an aerial advertising company." Upon returning home, Sharon was greeted not only by the news and a champagne toast, but also by the airborne message shown above. Last week at Wimbledon, Walsh-Pete lost in singles but was awaiting her first doubles match with partner Potter.—ED.

PHILLY PHESTIVAL
Sir:
I'm a Phillies fan who deeply enjoyed your June 24 INSIDE PITCH item on their running and hitting festival against the Mets. That was not a Philly Phollies game. I also enjoyed seeing in Ball Park Figures the box score of the April 23, 1955 Chicago-Kansas City meeting, which tied the modern record for the highest scoring game. However, I wonder if you have the box from the Phillies-Mets game, because I missed it in the newspaper.
SARAH KLINGES
Quakertown, Pa.

•See below.—ED.

[originallink:10637351:43454]

NEW YORK

ab

r

h

bi

Backman 2b

4

1

3

1

Johnson 3b

5

0

2

1

Hernandez lb

2

0

1

0

Christnsn cf

2

0

0

0

Carter c

2

0

1

1

Reynolds c

3

1

1

0

Heep cf

5

1

1

0

Foster If

3

1

1

1

Hurdle rf

4

1

1

0

Santana ss

2

1

2

2

Gorman p

0

0

0

0

Schiraldi p

0

0

0

0

Sisk p

2

1

0

1

Staub ph

1

0

0

0

Sambito p

0

0

0

0

Knight ph

1

0

0

0

Orosco p

0

0

0

0

Totals

36

7

13

7

PHILADELPHIA

Hayes If

6

4

3

6

Schu 3b

7

2

4

2

Samuel 2b

7

3

5

2

Schmidt lb

2

2

2

2

Jeltz ss

4

1

1

1

Wilson rf

6

4

3

3

Diazc

4

3

3

3

Rucker p

2

1

2

0

Andersen p

0

0

0

0

Maddox cf

4

3

2

2

Thomas cf

1

0

0

0

Aguayo ss

1

1

0

1

G Gross 1 b

2

1

1

2

Hudson p

3

1

1

1

Wockenfuss c

1

0

0

0

Totals

50

26

27

25

New York

003

220

000—7

Philadelphia

970

051

40x—26

Game Winning RBI—Hayes (4).
E—Santana, Hayes, Johnson. DP—NY 2, Philadelphia 1. LOB—NY 7, Philadelphia 9. 2B—Diaz 3, Wilson 2, Schmidt, Santana, Foster, Johnson, Samuel, Schu, Rucker, Jeltz. 3B—Schu, Maddox. HR—Hayes 2 (5). SB—Samuel 2(17). SF-Santana, Foster, Gross.

IP

H

R

ER

BB

SO

New York

Gorman L,3-3

‚Öì

4

6

6

2

0

Schiraldi

1‚Öì

10

10

10

0

1

Sisk

2‚Öì

2

0

0

0

1

Sambito

3

9

10

8

5

0

Orosco

1

2

0

0

0

1

Philadelphia

Hudson W,2-6

5

13

7

6

0

3

Rucker

3

0

0

0

2

2

Andersen

1

0

0

0

1

1

HBP—Aguayo by Schiraldi, Wild pitch—Schiraldi, Rucker. Balk—Hudson. T—3:21. A—22,591.

Sir:
That was a very interesting box score of the game between the White Sox and the Kansas City A's. I was a Sox fan living in Chicago 30 years ago, and I can remember that game vividly. But the game the next day was even more remarkable. Alex Kellner, the veteran lefthander of the A's, shut out the Sox 5-0. From the penthouse to the outhouse virtually overnight.
GEORGE STAFFORD
Manhattan Beach, Calif.

TWO PHOTOS

Letters should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and be addressed to The Editor, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York. N.Y. 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)