19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

August 04, 1985

LONG LEASE ON LIFE
Sir:
I just finished reading perhaps the best article I have ever read in your publication, Paul Zimmerman's The Long Way Up (July 22). I believe that Howie Long will become one of the greatest linemen ever. I also feel he's underrated even though his two All-Pro selections speak for themselves. By the way, great cover of Long. It's hanging in my room right next to a picture of Mean Joe Greene!
JEFF ROMEO
Mahopac, N.Y.

Sir:
Justice is served! Thank you so much for adorning your cover with Howie Long! Perhaps now your female readership will feel that it has been given a cover equivalent to that of the swimsuit issue.
WEEZIE FOYE
Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

Sir:
As a San Diegan, I am a bona fide Raider-hater. However, the July 22 cover of Howie Long has weakened my resolve. He is absolutely gorgeous.
MARY MCNERNEY
San Diego

Sir:
Now that a "Townie" has become my favorite NFL player, please answer a question that was bypassed in the article: Did Howie Long get his degree from Villanova? If he didn't, he'll find it a much Longer way up after the NFL.
NANCY BROUILLARD MCKENZIE
Bethesda, Md.

•Long was graduated with a B.A. in communications in 1981.—ED.

Sir:
It's hard to believe that a man of Long's size and stature would have to battle fear and self-doubt. So often people create their own obstacles. Obviously, this is one battle Long has overcome. What an inspiration to all the pessimists in the world!
DOUGLAS A. BROWN
Arlington Heights, Ill.

STARGAZERS
Sir:
Finally it's over, at least for this season (A Heavenly Night For The Stars, July 22). Let's hope your magazine will never have to write another article describing the junior-varsity caliber of play in the USFL.
GREGORY REEVES
Eugene, Ore.

Sir:
Paul Zimmerman gave everyone an insight into the decisions the USFL will have to make. What wasn't appreciated was his opening remark, "Goodby, USFL. See you in the fall. Or not at all." Come on, SI, how about a little support for these players and the product that they put on the field, which has been getting better each year.

I also don't want your readers to think that the Stars were handed their second consecutive championship on a 15-yard penalty. Anyone who was there can tell you that both teams committed personal fouls all night. If there is a merger in the future, which would be a good idea, the Stars will prove they can compete evenly with almost anyone.
RANDY S. ROBERTS
Newport News, Va.

Sir:
I continued reading the article only to learn the answer to Paul Zimmerman's question, "...who won the last WFL championship game?" He didn't say. How about helping a trivia buff out? Who did win that game 11 years ago?
WALTER V. SHERWOOD
Brooklyn

•Reader Gumula remembers.—ED.

Sir:
On Dec. 5, 1974 the Birmingham Americans defeated the Florida Blazers 22-21. I know: Who cares!
T.J. GUMULA
Ware, Mass.

BAKER'S BUNCH
Sir:
That was a good article on the U.S. Women's Open by Barry McDermott (Opening In High Style, July 22). But you blew it by not putting Kathy Baker—and Judy Clark—on the cover.
JIMMIE HEDGPETH
Concord, N.C.

Sir:
Since Kathy Baker doesn't like golf clothes, is it possible for SI to put her in next year's swimsuit issue? What a beautiful woman!
GLYNNE COLLENBACK
Fredericksburg, Texas

Sir:
Please satisfy the curiosity of the entire male population. Is Kathy Baker married?
DAVE DONAHOWER
Greenwich, Conn.

•No, she isn't.—ED.

RATIONALE
Sir:
Gosh, are you folks making fun of me?

It's not surprising that after I won the H.C. Rogers Fun Run (SCORECARD, July 15), the quotes used by the wire services focused on the "pain and suffering" angle. Anyone who tries running 165 miles through the hills of West Virginia in the heat of summer is bound to suffer some discomfort.

Even so, it was not a perverse exercise in masochism. There is simply a great satisfaction in accomplishing something so difficult that it boggles the minds of most people. Also, there was a $1,000 prize at stake. The only reason I ran so hard was that Jack Bristol provided tough competition. Because of him, I wound up running 146 miles in the first 24 hours. Once Jack dropped out, though, there was no one else within hours of me, so I took a short nap and then merely walked the last 19 miles. Believe me, at that point I was quite happy to avoid any unnecessary pain. Consider me wimpy, but sane!
NICK MARSHALL
Camp Hill, Pa.

LONG, LATE GAME
Sir:
After being out of the country for almost a month, it was nice to be able to catch up on the sporting world with SI. One story that I found particularly interesting was Henry Hecht's account of the Mets-Braves 19-inning game (INSIDE PITCH, July 15). But there is still one thing I don't understand: Why did play go so late? I always thought that no new inning could begin past 1 a.m.
D.A. HAYES
Merrillville, Ind.

•The 1 a.m. curfew applies only to the American League. There is no curfew in the National League, except in the case of a rain delay after 12:45 a.m., when National League rules call for the game to be suspended and resumed at a later date.—ED.

BRONZED RED
Sir:
In your article about Marge Schott (Marge Has Them Eating Out Of Her Hand, July 15), who or what does the statue on her desk represent?
JOE MILLS
Charleston, Ill.

•The bronze commemorates the career of Reds catcher Johnny Bench.—ED.

JUST IN TIME
July 16, 1985
Sir:
It's midseason in baseball and time to pause. The high-flying St. Louis Cardinals have the best record in baseball and generate the same excitement the Gas House Gang did in the early '30s, yet not a word about the Cards from SI. Is this an example of East Coast selective journalism?

Signed, an excited Cardinal fan but frustrated SI reader.
MICHAEL HICKEY
Washington, Mo.

July 19, 1985
Sir:
My apologies to you! Three days after I wrote a letter criticizing SI for ignoring the most exciting team in baseball, the St. Louis Cardinals, you gave the Cardinals the attention they deserve in an excellent piece by Craig Neff (The Cards Are Coming Up Aces, July 22). Thank you for an ace of an article!
MICHAEL HICKEY
Washington, Mo.

PHOTOTONY TOMSIC PHOTONEIL LEIFER

Letters should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and be addressed to The Editor, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
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HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)