GREENPEACE
Sir:
I commend you for Robert F. Jones's article on Greenpeace (Warriors Who Will Not Stay Down, Sept. 2). On the surface, it may seem unrelated to athletics, but an underlying premise of all sports is the continued health of our planet. Playing fields, rivers and ice floes are all interconnected, and I admire the courage of the Greenpeacers, who use their own bodies to protect nature's delicate balance from those who would smash it for profit. The sad truth is, if they didn't, nobody else would.
JOSEPH LILLY
Port Washington, N.Y.

Sir:
As a sports fanatic who too often forgets that there are other important events going on in the world, I thank you for your timely report on "The Greenpeace Affair." We all need to be reminded of the transgressions that are being committed against us by the governments of the world as well as by big business.
ROBERT E. MONOVICH
Kalamazoo, Mich.

Sir:
Great article on Greenpeace by Robert F. Jones. Greenpeace's dedication to saving the environment is noteworthy and should be of concern to all. But do such articles belong in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED? I think not.

If they do, why not publish an account of the benefits of nuclear power generation, because if Wrigley Field ever does get lights, the Cubs will probably play under nuclear-generated electric illumination (more than 50% of northern Illinois's electricity is nuclear generated).

Leave this type of article to TIME!
ANDREW J. DIETRICH
Painesville, Ohio

Sir:
I like what Greenpeace is trying to do, but I do not, and will never, see the logic in the way they do it, such as breaking into the Dow Chemical plant. I enjoy such articles but, please, not in SI.
RON LEDERMAN
Madison Heights, Mich.

Sir:
I feel betrayed by SI. To me your publication has always been a pleasant alternative to the inhumanity that can be found on the pages of other weekly publications. I realize that this story must be told, and I congratulate you for recognizing that fact. But from now on, please place your emphasis on man's accomplishments on depoliticized athletic fields.
ZION GREENFIELD
Houston

BIG MAN ON CAMPUS
Sir:
Thank you for Rick Reilly's article on Boston College noseguard Mike Ruth (The New Mr. Big At BC, Aug. 26). It is refreshing to read about a man who has his priorities straight. At my level, it's sometimes hard to keep this game in its proper perspective. Your article helps.
BOB LADOUCEUR
Head Football Coach
De La Salle High School
Concord, Calif.

Sir:
Rick Reilly's article on Mike Ruth was excellent. Perhaps a more perfect title would have been The Gentle Giant From BC. As for Ruth's going on to the pros, no one should be pushed or pressured into doing something he doesn't feel 100% about, even if he is a perfect role model.

Whether Ruth decides to stall an opposing pro line or become a priest and deliver a Sunday sermon in front of a church gathering, I wish him the best of luck. One thing for sure, I'll be looking forward to reading more about him and his quest for the Outland Trophy in this, his senior, year.
MIKE CROWLEY
Corvallis, Ore.

Sir:
I found it uplifting to discover that such a powerful and somewhat ruthless man can also be such a caring individual. It is admirable that Ruth's reputation is being built on his bigheartedness and not his big body. I can proudly admit to being a fan of his.
STEVE J. SCHILZ
Cudahy, Wis.

K MANIA
Sir:
Forget Hulkamania, forget Macker Mania. I've got K Mania. Great piece by Craig Neff on Dwight Gooden (Dr. K: Awesome And Then Some, Sept. 2).
PETER HASSELMANN
Lincroft, N.J.

Sir:
Dwight Gooden for Sportsman of the Year!
MARC J. SLAMOWITZ
JEFF HOWARD
BRETT YORMARK
Bloomington, Ind.

AL ROOKIES
Sir:
While Earnest Riles of the Brewers may not be as magical with a glove as Ozzie Guillen (Another Oz, Another Wiz, Sept. 2), he swings a mean bat. As of Aug. 28, Riles had a .305 batting average, with 39 RBIs and four homers. He has proved to the rest of the league that he is an excellent all-around player. All he lacks is national exposure.
THOMAS P. AMRHEIN
Milwaukee

MILES AND MILES OF HITS
Sir:
I thought this little bit of trivia might be of interest. Question: When Pete Rose rings up his 4,192nd hit, how many miles will he have run from home to first base? Answer: 71.4.
BOB DEAN III
Valley Lee, Md.

NICARAGUA'S GAME
Sir:
I have just completed the Aug. 19 issue, and being a baseball enthusiast I read with great interest Leslie Bornstein's ON THE SCENE description of baseball in Nicaragua. No matter what the strife, baseball will continue to be played.

This story should be required reading for our prima donna major league players the next time they consider a strike.
VINCENT M. PIZZI
Ossining, N.Y.

SPARE THE ROD
Sir:
The picture of Boston College's Mike Ruth on page 56 of your Aug. 26 issue made me think that he may have jumped off the quarry cliff once too often. He has an open-faced spinning reel mounted on an upside-down casting rod. No wonder he doesn't catch fish large enough to keep. However, he's in good company: Polish patriot Lech Walesa has also been photographed while holding an open-faced reel mounted upside down on a similar rod. Ruth sounds too good to be true, but more power to him.
BOB DIGNEY
Madison, Wis.

Sir:
Mike Ruth sure looks stupid holding that mismatched reel and dime-store fishing rod. But since he jumps off cliffs and bench-presses 580 pounds, I'll let someone else tell him.
JOHN NEER
Alexandria, Va.

TWO PHOTOSJOE McNALLYRuth, left with catch and in inset, and Walesa both prefer the upside-down approach to angling. PHOTOANDRZEJ CYBULA/TIME[See caption above.]

Letters should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and be addressed to The Editor, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)