19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

July 06, 1986

RAYMOND FLOYD'S OPEN
Sir:
As a longtime admirer of Raymond Floyd, I was glad to see John Iacono's excellent picture of him on your cover. He surely deserved that spot after winning the 1986 U.S. Open (Guts, Grit And Grandeur, June 23). Also, congratulations to Rick Reilly on a memorable article.
THELMA K. BROWN
Burlington, Vt.

Sir:
Like most of the guys who subscribe to SI, I love to look at the girls in the annual swimsuit issue. But another has now stolen my heart—precious Christina Floyd, who adorns your cover with her beaming dad. I have the feeling that she is as much responsible for her father's big smile as is the Open title itself. She's adorable!
MARK MORING
Asheville, N.C.

NOT QUITE EVERYONE'S CUP OF TEA
Sir:
I take exception to William Taaffe's review of the World Cup soccer telecasts (TELEVISION, June 23). My wife and I have greatly enjoyed watching the games. I understand and appreciate the technical problems Taaffe grumbles about, but the games are not boring. Certainly they have more action than bowling tournaments, marathons and auto races as seen on television.

Taaffe also bemoans the lack of close-ups and slow-motion replays, and the "flying boxes" used for the replays, citing all this as a problem with the Mexican feed. In my opinion, the flying boxes are no more hokey than replays on American networks. While I agree that slow motion and closeups would be nice, especially to showcase the fancy footwork displayed, I applaud the full-field views being shown on the television screen. They enable the viewer to recognize the strategy and style of play and also allow for a greater sense of the flow of the game than would be realized from a continuous close-up on the ball. American football telecasts would benefit greatly from this manner of coverage.
DOUGLAS W. CORKHILL
Raleigh, N.C.

Sir:
Taaffe's diatribe on the World Cup telecasts reminds me of the ignorant fan who arrives in the seventh inning of a scoreless baseball game and says, "Good, I didn't miss anything." The assertion that low-scoring games are automatically devoid of excitement is characteristic of someone with little knowledge of soccer.
J.M. SANCHEZ
Westbury, N.Y.

Sir:
Soccer is a game for the patient sports fan, who is probably unheard of in the U.S. It is a game that must be experienced amid a festive crowd of people in a stadium. Also, I find soccer exciting because goals are at such a premium. When a goal is scored, it is usually scored with the kind of flair that would make any fan howl "Go-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-al!"
RICHARD FUHL
New Britain, Conn.

Sir:
Taaffe is right, but he missed the real attraction of World Cup soccer for those few of us who do watch on weekends: It is in a class with baseball, golf and bowling as a soothing lullaby for a Sunday afternoon snooze. Just the right length, too.
DONALD STALEY
Brandon, Fla.

THE AMAZIN'S
Sir:
I enjoyed Bruce Newman's article on the Mets (A Four-Letter Word For Shoo-In?, June 16). At one point, their lead in the National League East opened up to an incredible 11½ games, a club record for games in front. Even never-say-die Cardinal manager Whitey Herzog admitted the race was over. With a team so talented and a pitching staff that is simply dynamite, it is scary to think what the Amazin's can accomplish during the rest of the season.
MIKE KOHN
Woodhaven, N.Y.

Sir:
My delight upon seeing a piece on the Mets faded suddenly when I read Bruce Newman's unkind description of catcher Gary Carter as a man "obsessed with, uh, himself, actually." This is a popular criticism of Carter. However, I am still looking for evidence to support this allegation. Carter is exuberant and, I suppose, seems childish and extreme in his enthusiasm. But in his play and in the postgame interviews that I have seen, he appears unselfish and always gives credit to others.
KATHERINE A. LEONARD
Portland, Maine

Sir:
Concerning the public image cultivated by Mets catcher Gary Carter, I wish to point out that Carter has served as the National Sports Chairman for the Leukemia Society of America for the past year and has given unselfishly and unfailingly of his time in our efforts to increase public awareness of the progress being made in the research on and treatment of this and related diseases. Carter's mother died of leukemia in 1966, and he has vowed to do "whatever it takes" to find the cure for the disease. To date he has personally raised more than $40,000 for the society.
LAWRENCE D. ELLIS, M.D.
National President
Leukemia Society of America
New York City

SHINING STAR
Sir:
Ron Fimrite's piece (A Specialist In Flying Objects, June 2) on the Detroit Tigers' Darrell Evans was enlightening and confirmed my high opinion of Evans. In March 1984 I watched Darrell perform a "close encounter" with his new fans. He was out in the heat before and after the game to sign autographs, mine included, while the other ballplayers resembled UFOs in their hurry to leave. Evans has proved he can play and still be a class act, both on and off the field.
MARY ELLEN SPITZLEY
Ocala, Fla.

DEAR ANN
Sir:
Over the past 5 years I have written about 30 letters to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED in response to various articles that have appeared in the magazine. This means that Ann Scott (LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER, June 16) and her letters department have sent me about 30 replies.

It has always been a pleasure receiving these acknowledgements and knowing that SI takes the time to respond to its readers. At times my letters may not have been overly complimentary, yet Ann was always appreciative of my thoughts, as well as willing to defend the magazine's view. I wish her the very best on her retirement.
WAYNE KREGER
Miami

Sir:
I've written only once in 20 years, but I was most impressed when Ann Scott wrote and personally signed a thank-you letter on behalf of SI. You are losing a wonderful resource. Best wishes to Ann for a rewarding future.
RICHARD H. BURTON
Milwaukee

J BOATS
Sir:
What memories were brought back by the photograph of the J boat Shamrock V in your June 2 SCORECARD. It is too bad she couldn't wait in New York Harbor to take part in the Parade of Sail scheduled for July 4.

Duncan Brantley said that three J boats still exist. What are the names and whereabouts of the other two?
GREGORY A. COMNES
St. Petersburg, Fla.

•They are Endeavour (right, as she appeared in 1934), with which Britain's Thomas Sopwith competed unsuccessfully for the '34 America's Cup, and Velsheda (left), another British J that was raced against both Shamrock V and Endeavour but was never involved in America's Cup competition. Velsheda, built in 1932-33 for W.L. Stephenson, then chairman of Woolworth's in Britain, is still being raced in European waters, while Endeavour, rescued in 1979 from a "mud berth" in Cowes, England, is now being restored for her new American owner, Elizabeth Meyer. Incidentally, Shamrock V is taking part in the July 4 parade.—ED.

THE REAL EDWARD MANDERSON
Sir:
This concerns your June 16 FACES IN THE CROWD item on Edward Manderson of Grand Cayman, West Indies. Please be advised that the picture we furnished you of the Admiral Farragut Academy senior, who holds the Florida AA high school records in the triple and long jumps, is actually of Eric Manderson, Edward's younger brother. Here (above) is a photo of Edward. Please excuse our error.
ROBERT SULLIVAN
Bryn-Alan Studio
St. Petersburg, Fla.

•Thanks for the correction.—ED.

PHOTOKOS PHOTOTHE BETTMANN ARCHIVE PHOTOBRYN-ALAN

Letters should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and be addressed to The Editor, SHORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building. Rockefeller Center, New York. N.Y. 10020.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
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HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)