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HARD HITTERS

Aug. 11, 1986
Aug. 11, 1986

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Aug. 11, 1986

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HARD HITTERS

Edited by Gay Flood

Sir:
I have read Ron Fimrite's story on the Steele's Sports Co.
softball team (The Men Of Steele's, July 28), and based on my
experience with softball and Scott Virkus, I agree that this indeed
may be softball's greatest team.
I have played the game for the past 15 years and I have never
seen anyone hit a softball farther than Virkus has. During a
tournament two years ago in White Plains, N.Y., Virkus, playing for
the Garage Door from Rochester, hit eight home runs in 10 games.
Only one player had ever hit a home run out of this particular park,
but Virkus hit three. ''Bam Bam'' (that's Virkus's nickname) will be
remembered in this area for a long time.
MICHAEL DISPENZA
Hawthorne, N.Y.
Sir:
Fimrite mentioned Steele's lopsided margins of victory. In all
fairness to the teams that have beaten them, what kinds of margins
has Steele's lost by?
JEFF SWANSON
Mountlake Terrace, Wash.
-- On regulation softball fields, Steele's has lost twice to the
Smythe Sox of Houston, 40-27 and 23-14, once to Shubin's of Los
Angeles, 27-17, and once each to Great South of Atlanta, 23-21, and
Coors of Detroit, 25-24. In games played on baseball diamonds without
temporary softball fences, Steele's has lost 12-9 to the South
Florida All-Stars of Miami, 12-10 to Miller Medical of Waterloo,
Iowa, and 12-11 to the Lite Athletic Club of Daytona Beach, Fla. --
ED.
Sir:
If you are going to cover softball, why not cover it completely?
It does not take nearly as much athletic ability to play slo-pitch as
it does fast-pitch. Where is the challenge in hitting a ball that is
lobbed compared with hitting a ball thrown with speed from 46 feet,
as in fast-pitch? Just remember: Softball is for everyone, but
fast-pitch is for athletes.
SCOTT WALL
Savannah, Mo.
Sir:
Shame on you for running a silly story on sissy-pitch softball in
the same issue with a feature on Rickey Henderson, the Bronx Burner.
Hitting a 12-inch softball over a cheap fence with a 38-ounce bat and
a two-ton belly should be last on the list of America's sports.
RON OSBORN
Omaha

This is an article from the Aug. 11, 1986 issue Original Layout