THE WET AND WINDY WAY TO THE CUP

Boisterous breezes have made it drama time in Australia for America's Cup photographers—witness the portfolio in these pages—and now it's crunch time for the surviving American skippers (page 56).
January 05, 1987

No, New Zealand's sailors can't walk on water—their boat is hidden by the heavy seas off Fremantle—though some opponents might think that the Kiwis' 35-1 record is the result of some sort of miracle. Meanwhile, the winchmen on Stars & Stripes have ground away at a few big victories of their own.

Sailing Down Under can get a bit confusing, as a crewman aboard USA demonstrated one day when he was hoisted aloft in a bosun's chair (left). Still, it beats the job of America II's sewerman, who labors, unseen and unsung, packing sails belowdecks.

The crewmen of French Kiss are silhouetted by the afternoon sun as they prepare to raise the spinnaker during practice. An America's Cup sailor must take special precautions to protect himself from the brutal rays of Australia's summer sun.

After a day of racing on the Indian Ocean, salt from the sea encrusts both men and boat. No one goes to dinner until the hull has been hosed down, from deck to winged keel, and the crew has showered from head to toe.

THREE PHOTOSDAN NERNEY/DOT TWO PHOTOSDANIEL FORSTER/DUOMO TWO PHOTOSSHARON GREEN/SPORTS CHROME PHOTODANIEL FORSTER/TIME PHOTOROGER GARWOOD/WHEELER PICTURES

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)