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Letters

March 07, 1988
March 07, 1988

Table of Contents
March 7, 1988

Dodgers
The Winter Olympics
Golf
A Play In Four Acts
Perspective
Point After

Letters

Edited by Gay Flood

STEREOTYPES
I applaud Phil St. John's efforts (SCORECARD, Feb. 1) to address the appalling manner in which the U.S. treats Native Americans. All concerned citizens must confront racism on several fronts, including the elimination of derogatory caricatures and of offensive names and nicknames. How can I obtain a copy of the poster you showed? And what's the address of Fans Against Indian Racism?
RUTH L. HALL
Philadelphia

This is an article from the March 7, 1988 issue Original Layout

•Posters are available, for a donation of $5 each, from the National Conference of Christians and Jews, 100 North 6th Street, Suite 531-B, Minneapolis, Minn. 55403. The address of Fans Against Indian Racism is: 5925 32nd Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20015.—ED.

There is no missing the point of the poster. I am a black woman, and I have always considered myself sensitive to racist or derogatory remarks geared toward any minority group. I would like to apologize to the Native Americans for not even recognizing the nicknames for the insults they are. Now that it has been pointed out to me, I am anxiously awaiting the day when the Washington football team and the Cleveland baseball team announce new nicknames. I hope the schools and colleges that use such nicknames will follow the example of the Minneapolis Southwest Secondary School and change theirs as well.
SHEILA M. ANGEL
Greensburg, Pa.

As a Purdue alumnus I was saddened to see in the poster that Purdue Pete, the Boilermaker mascot, is now cheering for Pittsburgh. What is the explanation for this surprising development?
MICHAEL L. STRUBLE
Tinton Falls, N.J.

•Cutting out Purdue and pasting in Pittsburgh under the Boilermaker mascot was an attempt by the artist to create a fictional team pennant. However, the artist says that in response to calls from Purdue fans, the second printing of the poster carries a "generic symbol."—ED.

TYSON VS. HOLMES
It took longer to read your article on the fight (The End of the Trail, Feb. 1) than the fight itself lasted—and longer, I'm sure, than it took Larry Holmes to laugh all the way to the bank. Still, it was good to read that the two participants were so civil to each other in the end.
CHRIS MORING
Norfolk, Va.

I visualize a senior league for boxing, something similar to the one in golf. This would give Larry Holmes and others, like George Foreman, an arena suited to their skills.
ARNOLD SHELBY
Houston

HOW HIGH?
I read with great interest your item about the vertical jump (COLLEGE BASKETBALL, Feb. 1). Morin Bishop stated, "Until there is a consensus on how such a test should be administered and who should administer it, vertical leap stats are best considered leaps of faith." The National Strength and Conditioning Association has a specific procedure for testing the vertical jump. The procedure includes starting flat-footed and jumping off both feet without taking a step. A qualified strength and conditioning coach should administer the test.

I too am skeptical of the 50-inch vertical jump. I've worked with a number of world-class athletes, and the best leap I've seen is 36½ inches. Two high jumpers who have cleared 7'6" each had vertical jumps of 31 inches. The best vertical jump on the national champion Miami football team was 35 inches, by defensive back Bobby Harden.
BILL FORAN
Strength and Conditioning Coach
University of Miami

A MAN IN NEED
I was most pleased to see the story on Joe Nieuwendyk (This New Flame Is Fiery Hot, Jan. 25). We are proud of Joe's accomplishments, as a student-athlete at Cornell and now as a member of the Calgary Flames. However, I feel I must clarify your statement, "A scholarship to Cornell was arranged [for Joe]." Cornell is a member of the Ivy League and does not award scholarships on the basis of athletic ability. Any financial aid is based on need and is distributed to all students on the same basis.
LAING E. KENNEDY
Director of Athletics
Cornell University
Ithaca, N.Y.

DALE AND TRIP
In the profile of Dale Murphy for your feature on Sportsmen and Sportswomen of the Year (Athletes Who Care, Dec. 21) you misidentified our organization. Murphy is a member of the advisory board of the Children's Wish Foundation [not the Make-A-Wish Foundation].

Here is an example of what we do. In June 1986 we received a letter about a five-year-old boy named Trip Kitts, who was ill with cystic fibrosis. Trip had a wish: He wanted to see a baseball game and meet a player. Children's Wish Foundation sent Trip and his parents to the Astrodome to attend the '86 All-Star Game, where he met his hero, Murphy (see below). According to his mother, Trip has been doing wonderfully ever since.
LINDA DOZORETZ
Executive Director
Children's Wish Foundation
Atlanta

PHOTOJIM KOONTZ

Letters to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and should be addressed to The Editor, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020-1393.