Letters

April 24, 1988

HOME OF THE HABS
As Austin Murphy's article (Hot Hand, March 21) on the Montreal Canadiens points out, "Montreal is the Mecca of hockey." Not only have Les Canadiens won 23 NHL championships, but they also have brought to this beautiful city a feeling of pride and hope. When the Habs are winning, the city is buzzing.
GEORGE LEVESQUE JR.
Montreal

METICULOUS MET
Thanks for Jill Lieber's inspirational article on the Mets' rising minor league star, Gregg Jefferies (Waiting to Splash Down, March 21). Reading about one family's dedication to a son's goal of making a major league club brings out the dreamer in all of us. Jefferies certainly does more than the coach orders: swinging a bat in a swimming pool, batting tennis balls in a gym and catching taped baseballs on asphalt. I have been doing some of these same drills to aid my own baseball career. No matter how much success I have had—I'm playing American Legion ball and hope to make the team at Boston University, where I'm a freshman—I know that I can always improve.
DIRK BAKER
Auburn, Mass.

GOOD EXAMPLES
Thank you for the articles on Larry Bird (A Player for the Ages) and Mike Tyson (Tyson the Timid, Tyson the Terrible) in your March 21 issue. Each athlete is the best in his field; each deserves to be respected and admired for what he has accomplished.

However, without the faith of mentors, Tyson's and Bird's lives would be quite different today. Cus D'Amato believed in a troubled 14-year-old; Georgia and Joe Bird supported their son despite their own problems and without attempting to live their lives through him. It is clear that these young men struggled through periods of inner doubt and confusion. The role played by their mentors enabled them to grow through the process.

A lesson we can all learn from these stories is that people, youths in particular, become better citizens if someone believes in them. As I look around my East Harlem community and see so many young people turning to drugs, crime and sex as an escape, I see the need for more mentors like Cus D'Amato and more caring parents like Joe and Georgia Bird. No one is perfect, of course, but at least these adults cared.
(REV.) JAMES L. BREWER-CALVERT
Associate Pastor
Church of the Living Hope
New York City

I am a junior high teacher, and I want to thank Larry Bird for illustrating the importance of education. From his decision at Indiana State to stay for his senior year and get his degree rather than go early to the NBA, to his repossession of the Jeep he gave his younger brother, Eddie, until Eddie brought up his grades, Bird demonstrates that he values learning. Thanks, Larry, for your dedication to excellence in a world in which many people take the easy or most profitable way out.
JAN GARRETT
York, Pa.

I am 13, live in California and usually get things handed to me. This is not to say that I'm spoiled, but when push comes to shove, my parents give me what I want. Therefore, it was fascinating to read an article about Mike Tyson, someone I admire very much, and to learn how different his childhood was from mine. It made me realize how much I take for granted, even simple things, like a mother and a father. I now feel closer to my parents, and I appreciate what they have given me.
CHRIS HAYDOCK
Palm Springs, Calif.

THE RIVERA CASE
After reading your SCORECARD item (March 21) on University of Miami point guard Maria Rivera, I was disappointed in FIBA, the international basketball federation. As a native of Puerto Rico, Rivera is a U.S. citizen by law and should have every right to try out for the U.S. Olympic basketball team.
STACY REUSS
Thousand Oaks, Calif.

THE FOREST SERVICE (CONT.)
I applaud you on The Forest Service Follies (March 14), an article consistent with SI's history of enlightening us on important ecological issues. Wouldn't it be nice if all failing businesses could be underwritten by some federal agency without annual accountability to Congress. The mills of my state, Rhode Island, have vanished because of economic factors. I am not a fanatical environmentalist. Rather, I wish to enjoy our national treasures with my family, and I want proper management and use of those resources to support industries like lumber. But the free ride provided by the Forest Service to pay for roads and logging facilities, and the selling of old-growth trees for $2 is an affront to all taxpayers who must make their businesses run at a profit or close up shop. The pulp industry should have to survive on its own or face the music like the rest of us.
TOBY L. ALTERMAN
East Providence, R.I.

Turning old-growth forest into wood pulp is like turning the cathedral at Chartres into pea gravel.
MICHAEL STEBBINS
Newton Centre, Mass.

What on earth does management or mismanagement of the forests have to do with SPORTS ILLUSTRATED—or is taking potshots at the U.S. Forest Service a new sport?

Tell John Skow he can split firewood forever, but that will not make him an authority on timber!
MRS. WILLIAM KNECHTEL
Baker, Ore.

BUSY BEAVER
I enjoyed your article on the NCAA wrestling championships (A Cactus Supplants Corn, March 28). You noted that heavyweight Carlton Haselrig, the Division II champ from the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown, thrashed Oregon State's Dave Orndorff 12-2. I think it's also worth noting that Orndorff entered the tournament unseeded and then proceeded to defeat the 11th, seventh, sixth and third seeds—Wyoming's Jon Cogdill, Iowa's Mark Sindlinger, North Carolina State's Mike Lombardo and Edinboro (Pa.) University's Dean Hall, respectively—to make the championship round.

Orndorff, a senior, is not just a one-dimensional athlete. He also has been an outstanding center for the Oregon State football team.
JON S. COOKE
Bremerton, Wash.

WRESTLING RELATIVES?
In your March 14 article (How Low Can You Get?) about John Smith, the outstanding wrestler from Oklahoma State, there is a reference to a wrestler named Glenn McMinn of Arizona State. In that same issue, in FACES IN THE CROWD, there is an item about Wayne McMinn, a high school wrestler from Apache Junction, Ariz. Are they related?
PETER MOEN
Marshall, Minn.

•Yes, they're brothers.—ED.

STATE OF FACES
About 10 years ago, it occurred to me that I had never seen any compilation that would tell me what state was represented most often in your FACES IN THE CROWD section. My thought was that it might be my native Pennsylvania. Well, I decided to keep track and tot up the numbers myself, and here are the results of my research for the years 1978-87. As you can see, Pennsylvania was first only in 1980, though the Keystone State has consistently finished in the top five.
SEAN HICKEY
Radnor, Pa.

[originallink:10654321:702633]

Letters to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and should be addressed to The Editor, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020-1393.

STATE

YEAR

TOTAL
FACES

RANK

'78

'79

'80

'81

'82

'83

'84

'85

'86

'87

ALABAMA

3

2

0

2

2

5

4

8

3

0

29

30*

ALASKA

1

2

2

1

4

3

2

3

1

1

20

34*

ARIZONA

3

3

1

5

6

4

5

8

2

4

41

26

ARKANSAS

0

1

3

1

4

4

2

0

1

0

16

40*

CALIFORNIA

40

33

24

43

26

24

35

14

26

30

295

1

COLORADO

4

3

4

7

5

3

7

3

7

5

48

22*

CONNECTICUT

6

5

4

5

4

2

8

5

7

7

53

20*

DELAWARE

1

1

2

1

0

2

1

1

1

2

12

46*

FLORIDA

12

21

13

16

16

21

16

24

22

28

189

4

GEORGIA

7

9

5

6

5

6

6

8

10

7

69

15

HAWAII

3

0

3

0

1

4

3

1

2

2

19

37*

IDAHO

3

0

1

0

0

2

4

1

0

1

12

46*

ILLINOIS

6

10

8

9

8

8

8

12

15

13

97

9

INDIANA

4

5

3

9

12

6

7

8

7

10

71

14

IOWA

7

5

7

7

6

1

4

6

4

6

53

20*

KANSAS

5

5

5

2

3

1

8

4

6

4

43

25

KENTUCKY

2

0

3

2

6

3

8

2

6

0

32

29

LOUISIANA

6

5

7

3

2

3

4

5

2

3

40

27*

MAINE

4

3

2

2

0

1

2

4

2

7

27

32

MARYLAND

11

9

11

10

10

7

8

4

5

8

83

10

MASSACHUSETTS

10

12

9

11

12

11

7

11

9

18

110

7

MICHIGAN

8

5

9

7

4

8

8

13

9

6

77

12

MINNESOTA

12

14

10

10

9

10

6

1

6

3

81

11

MISSISSIPPI

0

3

1

0

3

3

2

1

0

0

13

44*

MISSOURI

10

6

5

10

8

4

2

7

4

6

62

17

MONTANA

0

0

3

1

0

1

1

1

1

1

9

50

NEBRASKA

3

1

1

2

1

0

4

4

1

3

20

34*

NEVADA

0

2

1

3

1

0

2

1

3

3

16

40*

NEW HAMPSHIRE

1

1

1

3

1

4

1

1

1

0

14

42*

NEW JERSEY

11

14

7

3

12

6

14

12

9

13

101

8

NEW MEXICO

4

7

1

4

2

4

6

1

3

8

40

27*

NEW YORK

27

26

20

19

24

24

17

25

27

12

221

2

NORTH CAROLINA

4

3

10

9

9

13

1

9

11

6

75

13

NORTH DAKOTA

1

1

0

2

0

2

1

1

3

2

13

44*

OHIO

9

16

18

12

14

13

13

10

11

11

127

6

OKLAHOMA

3

3

8

5

1

8

2

7

6

5

48

22*

OREGON

2

1

2

5

4

8

1

4

0

2

29

30*

PENNSYLVANIA

33

18

26

22

17

20

24

12

16

18

206

3

RHODE ISLAND

0

1

2

3

1

3

2

3

3

1

19

37*

SOUTH CAROLINA

3

1

4

0

2

2

4

1

3

6

26

33

SOUTH DAKOTA

0

2

3

1

0

1

1

3

0

3

14

42*

TENNESSEE

2

3

7

4

2

5

4

8

5

4

44

24

TEXAS

16

13

15

12

10

13

15

11

9

16

130

5

UTAH

4

5

0

2

2

3

1

1

0

2

20

34*

VERMONT

2

1

1

0

2

2

1

1

2

0

12

46*

VIRGINIA

3

0

8

5

10

5

5

6

7

5

54

18*

WASHINGTON

6

3

5

4

8

2

6

7

8

5

54

18*

WEST VIRGINIA

1

2

2

4

0

4

0

2

2

1

18

39

WISCONSIN

1

5

5

7

8

6

5

8

10

9

64

16

WYOMING

1

0

0

1

1

0

2

3

1

1

10

49

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

1

2

1

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

6

CANADA

3

3

4

4

9

6

3

4

5

2

43

OTHERS

3

11

9

6

9

4

3

5

2

2

54

*tie

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)