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Letters

Aug. 01, 1988
Aug. 01, 1988

Table of Contents
Aug. 1, 1988

Olympic Trials
Red Sox
Tony Dorsett
Davis Cup
Beach Volleyball
Cycling
The All-American
Point After

Letters

Edited by Gay Flood

TYSON AND??
I couldn't help but marvel at your July 4 cover photograph of Mike Tyson demolishing Michael Spinks. It shows that the heavyweight division is in a shambles and leaves little doubt that there is not one contender left worthy of carrying Tyson's socks—if Tyson wore any.

This is an article from the Aug. 1, 1988 issue Original Layout

It wasn't very long ago when the heavyweight division had at least four fighters (Muhammad Ali, George Foreman, Joe Frazier and Ken Norton) with the talent to win the crown, and they all did. Now, when you watch Tyson's opponents entering the ring to fight him, they appear to have something quite different in common: fear.
ERNIE SPENCER
Louisville, Ohio

Because Mike Tyson will likely have no real test in the next few years, why not give the public what it wants—entertainment? Herschel Walker has half-seriously suggested he would like to take on Tyson (SCORECARD, July 18), and that would be amusing. However, I see the big one as Tyson vs. Sylvester Stallone.
BOB SLOAN
Indianapolis

TWINS STYLE
Caps off to Peter Gammons for his article Mighty Minny Recovery (July 4). I look up to the Minnesota Twins, a real meat-and-potatoes bunch of ballplayers. They're quiet, intense, big and strong—the kind of guys who, week in and week out, just seem to get the job done. The rest of baseball, especially in the big media towns like New York City and Boston, must be thinking, "Who are these guys with the M'S on their caps, and why do they always seem to get 15 hits a game against us?" Here's to the Twins and to baseball the way it was meant to be played—dome excluded.
DAVE SACKS
Hyattsville, Md.

CUBS AT PLAY
I enjoyed Hank Hersch's article on the Chicago Cubs (Keep an Eye on the Kids, July 11). However, I was bothered a bit by Ryne Sandberg's statement that relaxing after a game by playing video games, as he and some other Cubs do, is "kind of childish." I hope Sandberg and friends never graduate to the type of entertainment too many other big leaguers have tried, such as getting drunk or snorting cocaine. I've got a feeling that part of the Cubbies' success is a result of their attachment to one another and the fact that they've found harmless ways to relax after games.
KEVIN M. FOLEY
West Newton, Mass.

MR. MINT & CO.
I enjoyed the article on baseball-card dealer Alan Rosen (Mr. Mint). I wish that I had kept my duplicate cards rather than giving them away or trading them. At least the rest of my childhood collection is intact, thanks to my mom. Please print Mr. Mint's mailing address.
NELS R. CHRISTENSEN
Sacramento

•Rosen's address is 28 Hilton Place, Montvale, N.J. 07645.—ED.

I am 11 years old and have been collecting baseball cards for about six months. I have 2,000 to 3,000 cards, mostly from the 1960s, '70s and '80s. Your story about Mr. Mint inspired me to keep collecting. Also, Mr. Mint, if you're reading this, give me a call. We can do business.
SAM AUCK
Bucyrus, Ohio

You can't have my cards, Mr. Mint! They are memories to me. I began collecting in 1968 for thrills, not bills.
PAUL R. CARROLL JR.
Mattapan, Mass.

The money-hungry have once again spoiled a good thing.
DREW MARKOL
Feasterville, Pa.

MIND YOUR METRICS
I believe you are swimming upstream. Your article on triathlons (Meet a Couple of Crazies, July 4) mentions a .9-mile swim, a 24.8-mile bike ride and a 6.2-mile run. How about a 1.5-km swim, a 40-km bike ride and a 10-km run? Let's be realistic—Americans know what meters are. Ben Johnson covered 100 of them, not 109.36 yards, in 9.83 seconds.
WILLIAM HARVIE
La Jolla, Calif.

UNDERVALUED
I loved Dan Geringer's article about baseball-card collecting (Mr. Mint, July 4). However, it reminded me of a humiliating experience.

A few years ago I attended a baseball-card show in Minneapolis at which I asked a prominent dealer if he had any copies of the 1974 rookie catchers card. After searching through his collection, he located nine of those cards. When I asked how much he wanted for them, he replied, "Ah, you can have them. They aren't worth anything!"

Little did he know that I was one of the catchers on that card. I've been chagrined ever since, but Mr. Mint's statement, "Prices are going wild right now," gives me encouragement. Maybe even my rookie card is worth something in this frenzied market. One can only hope.
TOM LUNDSTEDT
Cubs 1973-74: Twins 1975
Apple Valley, Wis.

•Mr. Mint says the card (below) is worth as much as $2.—ED.

FOUR PHOTOSTHE TOPPS COMPANY, INC.

Letters to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and should be addressed to The Editor, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020-1393.