YOU'RE BEING WATCHED

January 15, 1989

Even before being crowned national champs on Jan. 2, the Miami
Hurricanes had ) gained a significant victory. College football's
team of the 1980s was an academic washout for the first half of the
decade: Only four of the 17 players who entered in '80 had graduated
by '85. Last month Miami announced that 16 of the 22 players who
entered school on scholarship in '85 would be getting their degrees
by May.
Some of that improvement may be attributable to the surreptitious
Hurricane Watcher Program, in which students spend 15 to 20 hours a
week shadowing academically unmotivated athletes and filing reports
on their class attendance. With the threat of punishment ranging from
sprints to suspension, more and more football players have been
finding their way to class. Even though the watchers never identify
themselves to the athletes they watch, the athletic department
insists that the two-year-old operation isn't spying because the
goal is to help the athletes, not to catch and punish them. ''I don't
know who the Hurricane Watchers are,'' says safety Charles Pharms,
''but even if I did, I wouldn't threaten them.''
The federal Department of Education pays the bulk of the watchers'
salaries through its work-study funds, so Miami doesn't incur much
cost for a program that helps to keep its players eligible. Says Doug
Johnson, Miami's associate athletic director for internal operations
and compliance, ''Sometimes you need to train an athlete to be
mature.''

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)