Letters

January 23, 1989

BUSH CONNECTIONS
In his story on George Bush's athletic interests and background (A Sportsman Born and Bred, Dec. 26-Jan. 2), George Plimpton neglected to mention our illustrious alumnus, the President-elect's paternal grandfather, Samuel Prescott Bush.

A member of the Stevens Institute of Technology class of 1884. Bush was on the varsity football (see above) and baseball teams, belonged to the tennis club and served a term as a director of the Stevens Athletic Association, all while earning his bachelor's degree.

In the early 1890s, Bush assisted Ohio State football coach Jack Ryder and helped organize an amateur baseball league in Columbus—he played second base on the Pennsylvania Railroad Columbus Shop team. In 1892 he and two others organized one of Columbus's first tennis clubs. Later, as a charter member of the Scioto Country Club in that city, he chaired the club's golf-course construction committee.

Bush, who died in 1948, was a noted industrialist—railroads and steel were his businesses—who also performed extensive civic and community service. Stevens recognized that service in 1947 by awarding him an honorary degree of doctor of engineering.
HAROLD J. RAVECHÉ
President, Stevens Institute of Technology

SI correctly reported that Bush's maternal grandfather, George Herbert Walker, was president of the U.S. Golf Association but did not add that his father also held that office. Prescott Bush was president of the USGA in 1935.
FRANK HANNIGAN
Senior Executive Director, USGA
Far Hills, N.J.

That was a great article on our President-elect, but I would like to straighten out one thing. George Plimpton quotes George Bush as saying of a childhood tennis opponent, "I wonder what's ever happened to Squash Collins?"

"Collins" (a Yale roommate of mine) is William Welsh Collin III [SI regrets that it misspelled the name], whose family lived for many years in Kennebunk-port, Maine. Squash graduated from Yale in 1948 and served honorably in World War II as a lieutenant in the Army Air Force. He has lived in Sewickley, Pa., ever since. Unfortunately, Squash recently lost a leg to arteriosclerosis and is no longer a terror on the tennis court.
HARRY W. WALKER
Vero Beach, Fla.

I enjoyed the excellent photography and article on George Bush. And the picture of Richard Nixon bowling was amusing. While the photographer was catching Nixon's nice release and good form, he also caught Nixon with his foot over the foul line.
THOMAS A. MARAKOVITS
University Park, Pa.

Judging from the photo, politics wasn't the only game in which Richard Nixon failed to toe the line.
SCOTT V. UNDERWOOD
Franklin, Ohio

NO. 1 IRISH
As I sat there at the Fiesta Bowl watching Notre Dame defeat West Virginia to clinch the national title (No. 1 with a Bullet, Jan. 9), I felt that Lou Holtz and his finely tuned machine surely did it the old-fashioned way: They earned it. When you beat three of the top teams in the final wire-service poll, as Notre Dame did, and finish 12-0, any remaining argument as to who is No. 1 vanishes in the Irish mist.
FRANK R. WYNNE
Los Alamitos, Calif.

Though I celebrated the Irish victory, I was disheartened by the manner in which they won. Why must a talented—and clearly superior—team resort to bush-league tactics like personal fouls and the taunting of opposing players?
MICHAEL T. OLIENYK
Crownsville, Md.

DEFENDING GIVENS
Hear! Hear! J.E. Vader, for your defense of Robin Givens (POINT AFTER, Dec. 12). Negative feelings toward Givens have been rampant, and although I tend to side with the bashers, you must be commended for taking an opposing stand and for the wisdom and insight you displayed in doing so.
DAVID R. REID
Atlantic Highlands, N.J.

I can't believe it! Now SI has a marriage expert. What's next? Dr. Ruth?
LAWRENCE RUBICK
Newberry, Mich.

PHOTOSTEVENS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGYGrandfather Bush (arrow) was a "rusher" on the 1883 Stevens Institute football team.

Letters to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and should be addressed to The Editor, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York. N.Y. 10020-1393.

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