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1980

Nov. 15, 1989
Nov. 15, 1989

Table of Contents
Nov. 15, 1989

SI At 35
1954
  • THERE HAVE BEEN GOATS AS WELL AS HEROES, AND AS MANY LOSERS AS WINNERS, BUT THE THREE-AND-A-HALF DECADES SINCE ROGER BANNISTER'S EPOCHAL FOUR-MINUTE MILE (LEFT), ON MAY 6, 1954, HAVE BEEN WONDROUSLY RICH IN ATHLETIC ACCOMPLISHMENT. THE FOLLOWING PAGES PROVIDE A YEAR-BY-YEAR CHRONICLE, BEGINNING WITH RON FIMRITE'S FOND AND EVOCATIVE LOOK BACK AT '54.

1955
1957
1958
1961
1964
1965
1967
1968
1969
1970
1972
1973
1974
1977
1978
1979
1980
1982
1984
1985
1986
1989
Ali
2054
Point After

1980

Bing Crosby's daughter (it now can be told) shoots J.R. Less suspensefully, Ronald Reagan routs Jimmy Carter, whose decision it was to boycott the Moscow Olympics. The Phillies, Raiders, Lakers and Islanders win in the pros; Louisville's Doctors of Dunk and Herschel Walker's Georgia Bulldogs in the college ranks.

This is an article from the Nov. 15, 1989 issue Original Layout

IN SI'S WORDS
MIRACLE ON ICE
For millions of people, their single, lasting image of the Lake Placid Games will be the infectious joy displayed by the U.S. hockey team following its 4-3 win over the Soviet Union. It was an Olympian moment, the kind the creators of the Games must have had in mind, one that said: Here is something that is bigger than any of you.... The American players...hugged and danced and rolled on one another. The Soviet players, slightly in awe, it seemed, of the spectacle of their defeat, stood in a huddle near their blue line, arms propped on their sticks, and waited for the ceremonial post-game handshakes with no apparent impatience. There was no head-hanging. This was bigger, even, than the Russians. "The first Russian I shook hands with had a smile on his face," said Mark Johnson, who had scored two of the U.S. goals. "I couldn't believe it. I still can't believe it. We beat the Russians."
—E.M. SWIFT

INCIDENTALLY
PRIORITIES
A four-member panel searches for a chancellor to head the University of Nevada. A 17-member panel searches for an athletic director for the school's Las Vegas campus.

INCIDENTALLY
BELTING THE CHAMP

Exchange at the start of a Washington-New York flight:

STEWARDESS: Mr. Ali, please fasten your seat belt.

MUHAMMAD ALI: Superman don't need no seat belt.

STEWARDESS: Superman don't need no plane, either.

Boston Marathon impostor Rosie Ruiz: "What's a split?"

Gipper Power.

A five-gold Lake Placid haul for Eric Heiden.

John Lennon (1940-80)

U.S. 4, U.S.S.R. 3.

Bjorn Borg outlasts John McEnroe 1-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-7 (16-18), 8-6. Will any other man ever win five Wimbledon titles in a row?

At 23, Seve Ballesteros becomes the youngest Masters winner.

From no mercy to no mas: In their first bout, Roberto Duran outslugs Sugar Ray Leonard, but he quits (above) in their rematch five months later.

WERE NO. 1: Bobby Knight

Sebastian Coe wins the Olympic 1,500. He'll repeat in '84.

A Super Bowl-winning grab by John Stallworth, a fourth ring for the Steelers.

Mount St. Helens blows its top.

TWELVE PHOTOSPHOTOHEINZ KLUETMEIER
"They wouldn't need a torch. They could just light Lake Erie."
—LYNN DIXON, COLUMBUS RADIO REPORTER, ON CLEVELAND AS A POSSIBLE ALTERNATIVE OLYMPIC SITE FOR BOYCOTTING NATIONS
"I understand the TV show That's Incredible!' has been filming on the USC campus. They shot 12 football players attending class at the same time."
—GEORGE RAVELING, WASHINGTON STATE BASKETBALL COACH (AND LATER COACH OF, UH, USC)