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1989

Nov. 15, 1989
Nov. 15, 1989

Table of Contents
Nov. 15, 1989

SI At 35
1954
  • THERE HAVE BEEN GOATS AS WELL AS HEROES, AND AS MANY LOSERS AS WINNERS, BUT THE THREE-AND-A-HALF DECADES SINCE ROGER BANNISTER'S EPOCHAL FOUR-MINUTE MILE (LEFT), ON MAY 6, 1954, HAVE BEEN WONDROUSLY RICH IN ATHLETIC ACCOMPLISHMENT. THE FOLLOWING PAGES PROVIDE A YEAR-BY-YEAR CHRONICLE, BEGINNING WITH RON FIMRITE'S FOND AND EVOCATIVE LOOK BACK AT '54.

1955
1957
1958
1961
1964
1965
1967
1968
1969
1970
1972
1973
1974
1977
1978
1979
1980
1982
1984
1985
1986
1989
Ali
2054
Point After

1989

Tremors shake the Bay Area. Oil fouls Alaska's waters. Troops crush the Tiananmen students. Reform rocks Eastern Europe. Baseball bans a legend. Batman makes a bundle. Zsa Zsa slaps a cop. The world spins on, and the A's, Flames, Pistons and Michigan's basketball team are on top of it.

This is an article from the Nov. 15, 1989 issue

INCIDENTALLY
MIXED SIGNALS
Information about Angel reliever Bryan Harvey, as flashed on the Anaheim Stadium scoreboard: WISH—TO END ALL KILLING IN THE WORLD. HOBBIES—HUNTING AND FISHING

IN SI'S WORDS
FALLEN IDOL

Baseball commissioner Peter Ueberroth announced on Monday that his office "has for several months been conducting a full inquiry into serious allegations" about Cincinnati Reds manager Pete Rose. Ueberroth, who on Feb. 20 summoned Rose from spring training in Florida to New York City for an unspecified purpose, did not divulge the nature of the inquiry, but SI has been told that the commissioner has information that Rose may have bet on baseball games.
—CRAIG NEFF MARCH 27

Pete Rose never grasped what was happening, not even when his baseball career finally crashed down upon him last week under the gathering weight of his gambling and lies and unsavory associations. Rose seemed to think that as baseball's alltime hit leader, he could not be toppled.... The apparent end of Rose's baseball career came suddenly. At a press conference in New York City last Thursday morning, commissioner Bart Giamatti announced that under a settlement signed by Rose at four o'clock the previous afternoon, he was banning Rose for life.
—JILL LIEBER AND CRAIG NEFF SEPT. 4

IN SI'S WORDS
THE EARTHQUAKE
Here we all were in this huge concrete bowl, some of us perched nearly a hundred feet above ground, after being rocked by one of this country's biggest earthquakes on record, and we were acting as if we had been through nothing more extraordinary than a grammar school fire drill. As we left the stadium, a friend of mine said, "I've seen bigger crushes when someone at my house shouts, 'Let's eat!' at a family dinner." But none of us had any idea then how serious the thing was.
—RON FIMRITE

The sword versus the pen.

The fabulous Bakker boy and girl.

Michigan's understudy coach, Steve Fisher, steals the show at the NCAAs.

Gordie Howe took 26 seasons to amass 1,850 points. Wayne Gretzky takes barely 10. This goal is point No. 1,852.

Pete Rozelle retires after XXIX years.

RESODDED: Lou Henson

We'll miss you, Kareem.

Joe Montana engineers a late, 92-yard drive to tame the Bengals in Super Bowl XXIII.

Greg LeMond's whirl wind finish yields his second Tour de France victory.

Another milestone for the ageless Nolan Ryan: 5,000 strikeouts.

Chris Drury pitches Trumbull, Conn., past Taiwan in the Little League World Series.

Bart Giamatti (1938-89)

Heroism and repression in Beijing.

The Giants' Kelly Downs after the earth shook.

FASHION PLATE

Payne Stewart

PHOTOMICHEL GOUVERNEUR/GAMMA-LIAISONEIGHTEEN PHOTOS
"Baryshnikov was great, but the play needs a shot clock."
—BUCKY WATERS, TV BASKETBALL COMMENTATOR. AFTER WATCHING MIKHAIL BARYSHNIKOV IN A SHOW BASED ON KAFKA'S "METAMORPHOSIS"