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A Roundup of the Week Jan. 15-21

Jan. 29, 1990
Jan. 29, 1990

Table of Contents
Jan. 29, 1990

David Robinson
Boston Bruins
Missouri-Kansas
Super Bowl Preview

A Roundup of the Week Jan. 15-21

Compiled by Stefanie Scheer

PRO BASKETBALL—The Bulls, who began the week with a controversial last-.1-of-a-second 109-106 loss to the Knicks (page 9), got a 44-point lift from Michael Jordan in their next game, a 132-107 win over the Warriors. Jordan had a team-record seven three-point field goals in that game, and he added 36 points in a 92-84 come-from-behind defeat of the Hawks. Chicago then extended its franchise-record home winning streak to 15 by holding off the Knicks 117-109 on the strength of 42 more points from Jordan. That triumph, coupled with a 107-97 Piston loss to the Pacific Division-leading Lakers, put the Bulls back into first place in the Central Division, and it gave Atlantic Division-pacesetting New York its third loss in a row, the Knicks' longest losing streak of the season. New York also fell 101-97 to the Spurs and 117-103 to the Mavs. Vlade Divac, a 21-year-old center from Yugoslavia, had his best NBA scoring performance—25 points—as the Lakers beat the Kings 111-91. But in Los Angeles's next game, against the SuperSonics, he was held scoreless and committed four fouls in just 10 minutes. The Lakers salvaged that game 100-90 by applying defensive pressure in the final 2:41, limiting Seattle to two points over that span while Magic Johnson scored six points. Johnson led another late comeback, against the Bucks, but Milwaukee's Fred Roberts, who missed three straight free throws, made the one that counted with 1.1 seconds left as the Bucks prevailed 103-102. The Jazz's three wins, 95-88 over the Hawks, 116-93 over the Hornets and 94-81 over the Kings, ran its winning streak to six games and pushed Utah past San Antonio, which got 104 points during its 2-2 week from rookie center David Robinson (page 14), into first place in the Midwest Division.

This is an article from the Jan. 29, 1990 issue Original Layout

BOWLING—DAVE HUSTED defeated Marshall Holman by three pins in a two-frame, sudden-death roll-off to win a PBA event and $33,000 in Las Vegas.

GOLF—PETER JACOBSEN shot a 2l-under-par 339 to defeat Brian Tennyson and Scott Simpson by one stroke and win the 90-hole Bob Hope Classic, in La Quinta, Calif. Jacobsen took home $ 180,000.

Patty Sheehan shot a one-under-par 212 to beat Pat Bradley, Lynn Connelly and Jane Geddes by three strokes and earn $75,000 in the Jamaica Classic, in Montego Bay.

HOCKEY—"A month ago, if someone had said we would be in first place, we probably would have chuckled a bit," Islander winger Randy Wood said of New York's meteoric rise from worst to first in the Patrick Division. Wood scored his first career hat trick as the streaking Islanders defeated the Jets 6-4 on the eve of the NHL All-Star break. The victory was New York's ninth straight. The Islanders, 18-3-1 after a 5-18-3 start, gained sole possession, by two points, of first place in the division from the Devils with the win. The Oilers, 2-3-2 in their past seven games and lacking the spark that had moved them from last to first place in the Smythe Division, let their lead slip away with a 6-4 loss to the Red Wings. Tied with the Oilers for the division lead were the Flames, who defeated the Blues 5-2 and tied the Bruins 2-2 and the Whalers 3-3. A controversial goal by Wendel Clark with 6:15 remaining gave the Maple Leafs a 7-6 victory over the Blackhawks. After Clark dislodged the puck from underneath goaltender Jacques Cloutier, who thought he had frozen it, the puck slid across the goal line and was declared a score. Nevertheless, Chicago was able to pull itself together by defeating the North Stars 3-1 and stopping the Canucks 5-2 to enter the All-Star break with a seven-point lead in the Norris Division. Boston ran its Adams Division margin to three points with a 4-1 win over Hartford and two ties. The Bruins' 59 points gave them the league's best record at the break (page 22).

INDOOR SOCCER—In a battle of the MISL leaders, David Byrne scored two goals, including the game-winner with 55 seconds remaining, to give Eastern Division-leading Baltimore a 7-6 victory over Western Division pacesetter Dallas. The win increased the Blast's lead to 1½ games over Wichita. The Sidekicks, whose margin over St. Louis was trimmed by the loss, defeated the Sockers 4-2 to regain a 2½-game lead at week's end.

SKIING—PIRMIN ZURBRIGGEN of Switzerland, the leader in the overall World Cup standings, finished third in the 50th Hahnenkamm downhill and 12th in the slalom to take first place in the two-day combined event, in Kitzbühel, Austria. RUDOLF NIERLICH of Austria won the slalom with a two-run time of 1:43.51, and ATTLE SKAARDAL of Norway won the downhill with a two-run total of 2:26.20.

At Maribor, Yugoslavia, VRENI SCHNEIDER of Switzerland won both runs of the women's slalom (total time: 1:19.93) to widen her lead in the women's World Cup slalom standings. MATEJA SVET of Yugoslavia won the giant slalom with a time of 2:10.51.

MILEPOSTS—AWARDED: By the College Football Association to ABC, a five-year, $210 million contract for the rights to telecast 25 to 35 games a year, beginning in 1991.

FIRED: As coach of the Washington Capitals, BRYAN MURRAY, 47, after the Caps' eighth straight loss dropped their record to 18-24-4. Murray, who guided Washington to the Patrick Division title in 1989 and had a 343-246-83 regular-season record in his eight-plus years at the helm, was replaced by his brother TERRY MURRAY, 39, who had been coach of the Caps' American Hockey League Baltimore affiliate.

NAMED: As football coach at Cornell, JIM HOFHER, 32, who had been an assistant at Tennessee; and as football coach at Marshall, JIM DONNAN, 45, who had been the offensive coordinator at Oklahoma since 1985.

As Driver of the Year, for the 10th time, by Harness Tracks of America, HERVE FILION, 49, who in 1989 won 814 races, a world record in harness racing, and passed the 12,000 mark in career victories.

RESIGNED: As football coach at Clemson, DANNY FORD, 41, amid allegations that 14 NCAA rules violations had been committed in his program between 1984 and '88. Since 1978 Ford had a 96-29-4 record, including the unofficial national championship in '81 (page 9). KEN HATFIELD, 46, who guided Arkansas to a 55-17-1 record over six years, was named to replace Ford.

SENTENCED: By an Oakland County (Mich.) court, former Detroit Lion defensive end REGGIE ROGERS, 25, to 16-24 months in prison for negligent homicide in the deaths of three teenagers in a 1988 automobile accident. In a test conducted after the crash, Rogers's blood-alcohol level exceeded the state limit by .05%.

SUSPENDED: By the NHL, Detroit Red Wing forward GERARD GALLANT, for three games for using force against an official in a game played on Jan. 13.

TRADED: By the Los Angeles Kings, center BER-NLE NICHOLLS, 28, to the New York Rangers for right wings TOMAS SANDSTROM and TONY GRANATO, both 25; and by the Boston Bruins, center KEN LINSEMAN, 31, to the Philadelphia Flyers for center DAVE POULlN, also 31.