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A Roundup of the Week March 5-11

March 19, 1990
March 19, 1990

Table of Contents
March 19, 1990

Jennifer Capriati
  • Dazzling new tennis star Jennifer Capriati, 13, showed that her future is now by deftly handling five more-experienced opponents—and the media—in her professional debut

  • Chris Couch played hooky from school to sample the perils and pleasures of pro golf

Figure Skating
Ohio Valley
Patrick Division
Baseball
  • With the baseball lockout stretching into its fourth week, the signs of spring were mostly unhappy ones. Big leaguers, meanwhile, did whatever they could, wherever they could, to get in shape

Kurt Rambis
Motor Sports
Basketball
About Faces
  • By Douglas S. Looney

    These six Faces in the Crowd bear witness that satisfaction still comes from just playing the game

Spotlight
Focus
Review
Point After

A Roundup of the Week March 5-11

Compiled by Sally Guard

PRO BASKETBALL—The Jazz got burned in Miami when Heat guard Kevin Edwards hit a three-pointer with 30 seconds left to bring Miami to within one point, at 104-103, and Glen Rice made a jumper at the buzzer to give the Heat the win. Utah nonetheless retained the Midwest Division lead by beating the Magic 111-101, the Bulls 98-94, the Bucks 108-100 and the Nuggets 110-109. The Central Division-leading Pistons' 3-0 week included wins over the Kings (101-91), the Nets (99-95) and the Hornets (98-88). Joe Dumars and Bill Laimbeer scored 25 points each in the defeat of Sacramento, and at week's end Detroit had won 21 of its last 22 games. The Knicks and the 76ers seesawed at the top of the Atlantic Division, with New York holding a 1½-game lead on Sunday thanks to the Celtics' 107-105 beating of Philly. Larry Bird scored 41 points for Boston, and Joe Kleine clinched the victory with an 11-foot jumper with eight seconds to play. Both the Knicks and the Sixers fell to the Trail Blazers, who won four straight games on their Eastern swing but were still 3½ games behind the Pacific Division-leading Lakers, who won three of four games. Meanwhile the other Pacific Division contender, the Suns, ran off four straight victories, beating both the Hawks and the Bullets 113-111, the Pacers 134-130 and the Timberwolves 101-98 in overtime, to continue their surge since the acquisition of Kurt Rambis (page 78).

This is an article from the March 19, 1990 issue Original Layout

BOWLING—AMLETO MONACELLI of Venezuela came from 20 pins behind after the fifth frame to beat Chris Warren 232-222 and win $20,000 at a PBA event in Columbus, Ohio.

FIGURE SKATING—At the world championships, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, KURT BROWNING of Canada successfully defended his men's title and JILL TRENARY of the U.S. won the women's crown. EKATERINA GORDEEVA and SERGEI GRINKOV and MARINA KLIMOVA and SERGEI PONOMARENKO, all from the Soviet Union, won the pairs and dance competitions, respectively (page 24).

GOLF—JOHN HUSTON shot a six-under-par 282 to beat Mark Calcavecchia by two strokes for his first PGA victory, worth $180,000, in Coral Springs, Fla. Sixteen-year-old amateur Chris Couch played the first two rounds of the tournament (page 22).

Maggie Will shot a two-under-par 214 to defeat Patti Rizzo, Ayako Okamoto and Val Skinner by one stroke and win a 54-hole women's tour event and $60,000 in Las Vegas.

HOCKEY—Before the Bruins and the Sabres—the NHL's top teams—met last week, Boston had allowed a league-low 191 goals all season. The Bruins then let in the most goals they have allowed in a home game since 1966, in a 10-4 drubbing that also put an end to their four-game winning streak. Boston nevertheless held on to the Adams Division lead. The Blackhawks, second in the Norris Division, behind the Blues, were told by the NHL that starting March 13, they would lose the services of defenseman Dave Manson for three games. He and the Capitals' Scott Stevens each got that punishment for fighting in a Feb. 27 game. Stevens claimed that Manson bit him, and Manson charged that Stevens tried to gouge his left eye. The Oilers briefly overtook the Flames for the Smythe Division lead with a 4-3 overtime victory over the Penguins, but Pittsburgh did the Flames a favor the following day by losing 6-3 in Calgary. The surging Rangers won two of three outings to maintain their lead in the Patrick Division (page 36).

MOTOR SPORTS—AYRTON SENNA, driving a McLaren-Honda, beat Jean Alesi, in a Tyrrell-Ford, by 8.685 seconds to win a Formula One race in Phoenix. Senna averaged 90.586 mph for 72 laps around the 2.36-mile, 13-turn circuit (page 82).

RIFLERY—WEST VIRGINIA outgunned runner-up Navy to win the NCAA title in Annapolis, Md.

SKIING—Having clinched a record-tying fourth World Cup overall title the previous weekend, PIRMIN ZURBRIGGEN of Switzerland, who will retire this year, won his farewell Super G, in Hemsedal, Norway. The victory also won him the Super G title for the season. In Geilo, Norway, ALBERTO TOMBA of Italy prevailed in a slalom by a whopping 1.19 seconds. In women's competition CAROLE MERLE of France came in first in a giant slalom in Stranda, Norway, 66 of a second ahead of runner-up Kristi Terzian of the U.S. Austria's KARIN BUDER won a slalom in which six of the top seven places were taken by her countrywomen.

Vermont scored 671 points to beat Utah by 100 and win the NCAA title, in Stowe, Vt.

TENNIS—STEFAN EDBERG beat Andre Agassi 6-4, 5-7, 7-6, 7-6 to win the Champions Cup and $125,000, in Indian Wells, Calif.

Gabriela Sabatini defeated Jennifer Capriati 6-4, 7-5 to earn a women's tour title and $70,000 in Boca Raton, Fla. (page 16).

TRACK & FIELD—At the NCAA Indoor Championships, in Indianapolis, ARKANSAS beat Texas A&M by eight points to win the men's title, and TEXAS prevailed in the women's competition by 24 over Wisconsin.

MILEPOSTS—FINED: By the NBA, for fighting in a game on March 5, Golden State Warrior center MANUTE BOL, $3,000, and Charlotte Hornet center J.R. REID, $2,500.

PLACED ON PROBATION: For three years by the NCAA, the UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND men's basketball program, for violations committed from 1985-86 through '88-89, including the selling of complimentary tickets by players and the providing of improper transportation to recruits by the staff. The Terrapins were also banned from live television for the '90-91 season and from postseason play in '91 and '92, and will lose two scholarships for each of the next two seasons.

REINSTATED: By the NHL, Detroit Red Wing forward BOB PROBERT, 24, who was expelled from the league a year ago following his arrest for possession of cocaine.

TRADED: By the Buffalo Sabres, right wing KEVIN MAGUIRE, 27, to the Philadelphia Flyers for defenseman JAY WELLS, 30; by the Hartford Whalers, goaltender MIKE LIUT, 34, to the Washington Capitals for left wing YVON CORRIVEAU, 23; by the Minnesota North Stars, right wing MIKE GARTNER, 30, to the New York Rangers for right wing ULF DAHLEN, 23, and a future draft choice; by the New Jersey Devils, defenseman REIJO RUOTSALAINEN, 29, to the Edmonton Oilers for defenseman JEFF SHARPLES, 22; by the Quebec Nordiques, left wing MICHEL GOULET, 29, goaltender GREG MILLEN, 32, and a 1991 draft choice, to the Chicago Blackhawks for defenseman MARIO DOYON, 21, and left wings EVERETT SANIPASS, 22, and DANIEL VINCELETTE, 22; and by the Vancouver Canucks, right wing RICH SUTTER, 26, and defenseman HAROLD SNEPSTS, 35, to the St. Louis Blues for defenseman ADRIEN PLAVSIC and two future draft picks.

DIED: JOE SEWELL, 91, a member of baseball's Hall of Fame; in Mobile, Ala. Sewell, who batted .312 during his 14-year (1920-33) career as a shortstop and third baseman for the Cleveland Indians and the New York Yankees, holds four major league batting records.