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Letters

Sept. 03, 1990
Sept. 03, 1990

Table of Contents
Sept. 3, 1990

First Person
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College Football '90
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Point After

Letters

JOE MONTANA
Congratulations on Paul Zimmerman's story about Joe Montana (Born to Be a Quarterback, Aug. 6). Being a devout Notre Dame fan, I wondered why coach Dan Devine didn't use Montana more often. Too bad Ara Parseghian didn't stay around past Montana's freshman year. He knew and used the talent on his squads—just ask (then) skinny, 160-pound Joe Theismann.
JACK F. KRACH
Fort Wayne, Ind.

This is an article from the Sept. 3, 1990 issue Original Layout

You would think the people in the Monongahela Valley would be proud of Montana. He has represented his birthplace in a positive way and will be remembered for his accomplishments on and off the gridiron when his few detractors will be nothing more than dust in the wind.
JIM McKENNA
JEFF JAQUES
Bishop Wickford, R.I.

I grew up in Donora, Pa., the home of Deacon Dan Towler, Stan Musial and both Ken Griffeys. Like Joe Montana, I graduated from Ringgold, which is the high school for both Donora and Monongahela, Montana's hometown.

The fact of the matter is, the Mon Valley is very proud of Montana. In 1982 Ringgold retired his football jersey, and today the gymnasium is decorated with banners acknowledging his Super Bowl accomplishments. I feel confident that one day Ringgold High's stadium will bear Joe Montana's name.
JAMES CARLOCK
Fort Worth

When I read that nine-year-old Joe Montana liked eating his mom's ravioli and playing catch with his dad, I thought, What else can a kid ask for? What else can a parent ask for? As a single parent raising two boys, I respect family closeness like that, no matter what the outside world sees or thinks.
FRED EHRLICH
Las Vegas

Any reason why Dr. Z did not include two others, Babe Parilli of Rochester and Jim Kelly of East Brady, on his list of outstanding quarterbacks from western Pennsylvania? I was born and raised in Mount Lebanon (Pa.) and was surprised that these two were not mentioned.
BILL RANKIN
Yardley, Pa.

I was interested in the chart of stats of outstanding quarterbacks that accompanied Paul Zimmerman's second Joe Montana article, The Ultimate Winner (Aug. 13). It's too bad rushing attempts and yards gained for each quarterback weren't included, because then Fran Tarkenton might have led in seven of nine categories instead of only five of seven.
MARK GEVIK
Hoffman, Minn.

•That's true. Tarkenton does lead in rushing attempts (675) and in yards gained rushing (3,674).—ED.

THE OLD REDHEAD
I am deeply pleased and touched by Lisa Twyman Bessone's UPDATE about me in your Aug. 13 issue. It is a wonderful tribute to my years as a broadcaster.
RED BARBER
Tallahassee, Fla.

The members of my car pool (Stan Weiland and Ron Shaffer) and I enjoyed the story about Red Barber immensely. We are on the road to San Francisco at 6:30 every workday morning. We ride in my old 1963 Buick (Barber would approve) Monday through Thursday, but on Friday I am required to drive my newer car, a '71 Jaguar. The old Buick's radio is AM only. Red and Colonel Bob are heard in these parts on FM radio at about 6:45 Friday mornings. We never miss his broadcasts. It's our "TGIF."
RON PENGILLY
Piedmont, Calif.

THE STEROID GAMES
Your July 9 SCORECARD contained an item about the Steroid Games in which "all the competitors will be on anabolic steroids" because all are recipients of transplanted organs. The steroid drugs used in the Steroid Games, which took place Aug. 3 through Aug. 5 in London, are corticosteroids, not anabolic steroids. Corticosteroids are used in the care of transplant patients to prevent tissue rejection. They are of value for their immunosuppressive properties as well as for being a potent anti-inflammatory medication. Anabolic steroids cannot suppress the immune system nor can they reduce inflammation. Anabolic steroids are on the USOC list of banned drugs, and corticosteroids are subject to certain USOC restrictions: They may be used topically with a doctor's permission, but not by mouth or injection.
S. KATHLEEN HIRTZ, M.D.
Springfield, Ore.

LOOK-ALIKES?
Is it just me, or is Jim Matice, the Young Adult Indoor National Bare-Bow Archery champion (FACES IN THE CROWD, July 16), a dead ringer for Phillie centerfielder Len Dykstra?
CHRIS NAQUIN
Schriever, La.

•Matice looks more like the younger Dykstra, when he was a Met.—ED.

PHOTOTERRY CLARKPHOTOFOCUS ON SPORTS

Letters to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and should be addressed to The Editor, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020-1393.