PLAYING FOR NOTRE DAME
As a former lineman who played through injuries, pain and frustration and also experienced glory during my four years at Notre Dame, I am struck by Steve Huffman's self-pity in his story, "I Deserve My Turn" (Aug. 27). Major college football is a tough game demanding extraordinary dedication and effort, especially at Notre Dame, where academic standards are not compromised. Huffman tries to excuse his failures in the classroom and on the field by denigrating a university and coach whose records are respected throughout the land. Maybe it's time for Huffman to "quit" blaming others for his problems and do what we all have to do sooner or later—grow up!
TOM SULLIVAN
Notre Dame '65
Phoenix

You can Huff(man) and puff, but you can't blow our Golden Dome down.
MARC BURDELL
Notre Dame '87
Carol Stream, Ill.

Huffman's story should be applauded. While Holtz is certainly a great motivator and successful coach, his hell-bent attitude toward winning represents the same pitfall that college and high school coaches all across the country have fallen into: a general disregard for people and ethics to achieve an end. The pressure on Holtz to win is admittedly tremendous, but the inclusion of the Huffman incident in Holtz's book demonstrates poor judgment toward a young man trying to find his direction in life.
JOHN M. HAKES
Burnsville, Minn.

THE LAST SPORTS TITLE
Jennifer Martin of Weston, Conn., was one of the featured people in the Aug. 20 FACES IN THE CROWD. She had led her high school, Central Catholic of Norwalk, to the state Class S softball title. What was not mentioned was that this would be the last sports title of any kind for Central Catholic High. A few months ago, because of financial problems, the Catholic Diocese of Bridgeport was forced to close the school. Martin, a member of the last graduating class at Central Catholic, and her teammates gave the city of Norwalk a fabulous going-away present. Much more pleasing, however, was the remarkable poise and enthusiasm they showed in playing for the glory of a school that, by the time the championship was played, had already ceased to exist. The struggle of these young women for excellence in such a situation dignified all of us who followed their progress.
PATRICK G. MATTHEWS
East Norwalk, Conn.

BASEBALL PALACE
I enjoyed Bill Nack's Hey, Hey, Hey, Goodbye! (Aug. 20) about the oldest ballpark in the major leagues, Comiskey Park. As one who "grew up" there—attending 750 games since 1939, covering seven decades—I will miss this grand old lady. I was fortunate enough to see World Series and All-Star Games there, and so many encounters with those hated Yankees. It will be tough to lose the Baseball Palace of the World, but the new Comiskey Park may soften the blow.
RONALD H. SNYDER
Park Ridge, Ill.

Chicagoans who might be mourning the demise of Comiskey should be grateful they are getting a ballpark for a ballpark. Seattle lost Sick's Stadium and got the Kingdome. At least Chicago's new park will look and feel as a ballpark should.
LISA HIGGINS
Mercer Island, Wash.

Twelve years ago, just before my husband, a rabid White Sox fan, asked, "Will you marry me?" he popped the most important question of all: "Are you a Cub fan or a Sox fan?" I got both answers right.
MARSHA WATERS SEBESTA
Oak Park, Ill.

I have saved the article in my infant daughter's "collectibles" folder so that she and I can enjoy it years from now.
BRUCE W. HAYDEN
Hinsdale, Ill.

A RERUN AT COMISKEY?
Given baseball's strong appreciation of its past (Hey, Hey, Hey, Goodbye!, Aug. 20), it seems clear that this year's World Series should be between the Chicago White Sox and the Cincinnati Reds. The 1919 Series must be replayed before the old park is torn down, in order to exorcise the Black Sox demon once and for all.
RALPH M. SEGALL
Evanston, Ill.

TWO PHOTOSUPI/BETTMANN NEWSPHOTOSMight a rematch lessen the notoriety of the Sox, who, with Shoeless Joe Jackson (above), threw the '19 Series to Edd Roush's Reds?

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