Letters

February 04, 1991

JIMMY CARSON
That was a super article by E.M. Swift about Jimmy Carson of the Detroit Red Wings (Coming Home, Dec. 24). I taught Jimmy in the fourth grade and later coached him in high school baseball before he went to play junior hockey in Canada. He was an excellent centerfielder, student and school citizen. He remembers his former teachers and comes by every now and then to say hello. I am happy for him, yet not at all surprised that his boyhood dreams have come true. No kid ever worked harder to reach his—ah—goals.
GLYNN CONLEY
Detroit

I first saw Jimmy Carson at a Mite Division tryout. He was six years old and skating circles around boys of seven and eight. As the coach in the league with the first "draft" choice, I selected Jimmy. He was easy to work with, because his goal, even at six, was to become an NHL player, ideally a Red Wing. Against the odds, he has accomplished that. I congratulate him and wish him continued success.
CLARK WHITNEY
Westminster, Mass.

As a former intercollegiate hockey player and current history teacher and ice hockey coach at University Liggett School, which Carson attended, I read Swift's article with enthusiasm. A number of my colleagues sing Carson's praises. On visits to the school, Carson will converse in French with his former French teachers and carry on intelligent discussions about world affairs with his onetime history teacher. Carson is a wonderful example for our young athletes.
JOHN FOWLER
Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich.

NEW COACH
Jackie Sherrill received a tremendous welcome at the press conference at which the official announcement was made of his appointment as football coach at Mississippi State (What Price Glory?, Dec. 24). Many Bulldog fans are still amazed that he was even interested in the job. His background as a winner is impressive.

Although Sherrill was not my personal choice, he is our coach now, and as one of the faithful who, as William F. Reed wrote, "have bled all these years, but still have bought their tickets and sat in the stands" only to see the Bulldogs lose more than they won, I just hope that he will be able to do what he says he's going to do—give us a winner and keep himself out of the NCAA doghouse.
JEAN M. ULMER
Germantown, Tenn.

As a Mississippi State graduate, I was offended by Reed's article on the hiring of Sherrill. We are excited to have Sherrill, and he is smart enough to realize a tainted program would end his coaching career-for good. Also, Reed's comments about Starkville are unfair and untrue, although it is true that the closest airport is 18 miles away. How far away is Reed from an airport? Mississippi is a beautiful state with pine forests, streams and rolling hills. It is known for its hospitality, Mr. Reed, but you are not welcome back.
SHAWN D. WARD
Dallas

In this day when most universities are attempting to clean up their acts, the Bulldogs are going in the opposite direction.
JOHN L. GILBERT
Houston

DR. Z'S ALL-PRO TEAM
I always enjoy reading Dr. Z's All-Pro team (A Stack of Bills, Dec. 31-Jan. 7), mainly because he rates the players on a wide range of criteria, something not always done with Pro Bowl players.

For a Chiefs fan, it was nice to see John Alt, Dan Saleaumua and Albert Lewis on Paul Zimmerman's squad. However, Steve DeBerg deserved to be the quarterback. He threw only four interceptions this year and was third in efficiency. That's not bad, considering the Chiefs' conservative offense and lack of quality receivers. Also, DeBerg played the final two regular-season games with a broken pinky on his left hand.
SCOTT HARRISON
Grand Rapids, Mich.

Zimmerman salutes the "dazzling array of talent" that the Bills now have. What he fails to note is that the Chiefs would match the five members of the Bills on Dr. Z's all-pro team if it weren't for his illogical exclusion of Chiefs kicker Nick Lowery and linebacker Derrick Thomas.

As for Rookie of the Year, the name below should give you an idea of who I support. Thanks for the April 30 cover of the other Jeff George, the Colts' quarterback (who is not related to me), as the NFL's No. 1 draft pick.
JEFF GEORGE
Chattanooga

Who is Dr. Z anyway? He didn't even prescribe Neal Anderson of the Bears for his offensive lineup. I'm changing doctors.
JONATHAN J. SEDORY
Milwaukie, Ore.

Zimmerman left off his list Viking Joey Browner, the best defensive back in the game.
BRYON REINHART
Hutchinson, Minn.

How can Zimmerman's team include such specialists as a receiver-back (Keith Byars of the Eagles) and a designated sacker (Charles Haley of the 49ers), but leave out a special-teams specialist (Reyna Thompson of the Giants)?
ROSS RIVIERE
Springfield Gardens, N.Y.

WHO'S IN WHO'S WHO
I take exception to Rick Reilly's Point After in your Dec. 17 issue. The publishers of Who's Who in America neither arbitrarily select individuals for, nor remove them from, this reference work. To ensure that our users have information on individuals of current reference interest, our editors continuously update the standards for inclusion for each edition. To ensure that our users have accurate information, we rely on the participation of our listees. In addition, the names that Reilly mentions as missing from our current edition can be found in the previous edition of Who's Who in America. This allows our users to find the information they want, because many libraries and information centers keep back editions of our publication.
JOHN L. DANIELS
Product Manager
Who's Who in America
Wilmette, Ill.

KANSAS, COACHES AND RECORDS
Alexander Wolff noted in Carolina Kids (Dec. 17) that North Carolina basketball coach Dean Smith, "by averaging 25 wins a season between now and 1994, would surpass his old college coach, Kansas's Phog Allen (left), for second place, behind Adolph Rupp (center), on the Division I victory list." Of interest is the fact that Rupp also played at Kansas, although he didn't coach there. Kansas's only coach with a losing record was James Naismith (right), the inventor of the game.
DAVE DOMANN
Langhorne, Pa.

PHOTOGEORGE SILK PHOTOJOHN D. HANLON PHOTOWORLD WIDE PHOTOS

Letters to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED should include the name, address and home telephone number of the writer and should be addressed to The Editor, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED, Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Center, New York, N.Y. 10020-1393.

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