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BEST FUTURE COACH?

Jan. 20, 1997
Jan. 20, 1997

Table of Contents
Jan. 20, 1997

Faces In The Crowd

BEST FUTURE COACH?

Being called a coach on the floor has long been considered one
of the game's highest compliments. But few of those receiving
votes in our poll concerning players best suited to become an
NBA head coach were thrilled by their selection. "I've thought
about doing it," says Chicago guard Steve Kerr, who was chosen
by two of the 29 pollees, one from each team, "but everyone I
talk to tells me not to."

This is an article from the Jan. 20, 1997 issue Original Layout

The winner was Jazz point guard John Stockton, who got eight
votes, four more than Pistons guard Joe Dumars. An All-Star in
eight of his 12 seasons, Stockton was called by one coach "the
heir apparent at Utah." He is not too eager, however, to ascend
to the throne. "Obviously being in the league for so long, you
do have something to offer as a coach," Stockton says. "But I
don't see that as being in the cards right now for me. I think
[my coaching] would be with younger kids."

The constant pressure from fans, agents, the front office and
the media makes the job less than appealing for most
players--especially stars, who are usually financially secure
when they retire. It's such a tough job, in fact, that several
respondents considered only the toughest men to fill it. How
else to explain the only other multiple vote-getter (who, by the
way, actually wants to be a head coach): Detroit's 38-year-old
enforcer, Rick Mahorn?

--DAVID FLEMING