Letters

January 19, 1998

The bottom line is everything in America cannot have a racial
overtone.
DOC WHITE, Eatonville, Fla.

LATRELL SPREWELL

I commend NBA commissioner David Stern for suspending Golden
State Warriors guard Latrell Sprewell--for saying enough is
enough (Center of the Storm, Dec. 15). The many good guys among
the league's players are being maligned because of the actions
of a few bad apples.
CATHY COURTAD, Bucyrus, Ohio

I am tired of pampered athletes thinking they can do what they
want and then whining and crying when they get in trouble for
doing it. Part of the problem is a culture that sets them on a
pedestal from the time they show promise in high school. When
they reach the pros, they begin to believe that they are above
the rest of us.
DENNIS MILLER, Ozark, Mo.

I find it amazing that P.J. Carlesimo didn't attack Sprewell.
The respect given to coaches in pro sports is diminishing, and
only hefty punishments by the leagues can restore that respect.
Well done, Mr. Stern.
GREG LANGLEY, Bryantown, Md.

Sprewell's agent says that the suspension handed down by the NBA
was too harsh, that if Sprewell were in any other job, he would
be allowed to seek further employment. I agree. Sprewell would
be allowed to seek further employment right after he got out of
jail for assault.
CHAD WHITEAKER, Jackson, Miss.

Sprewell's comment that he never wanted to be famous brought to
mind Charles Barkley's disclaimer that he isn't a role model.
Like it or not, when an athlete signs on the dotted line, he or
she is asking for fame and to become a role model. It is up to
that individual to decide what kind of role model he or she will
be. Fame goes with the territory, Latrell, but infamy doesn't
have to.
MARY ANN RAY, Temple, Texas

You should do a follow-up article, this time centered around
P.J. Carlesimo and his attitude toward the players he coaches.
It's relevant to point out that Sprewell isn't the only player
to feud with Carlesimo. There are always two participants in a
dispute. And two sides to every story.
DARRYL L. LYNCH, San Leandro, Calif.

Phil Taylor's article on the race problems in the NBA (The Race
Card, Dec. 15) was a gratuitous attempt to inject race into the
foreground, when, in fact, the Sprewell incident was not racial.
MICHAEL B. TITOWSKY, New York City

Jesse Jackson's POINT AFTER (Dec. 22) said what needed to be
said about Sprewell's attack on Carlesimo, that it was a man
assaulting another man. It deserved punishment, and a fair one
was handed down. There is no race issue, simply a moral issue.
Jackson is right: Until we stop treating athletes as people
above the law, we will have to put up with this problem.
CHRIS TOLSDORF, West Chester, Pa.

THE GIDDINGS INDIANS

I count my days as a high school football player as some of the
best of my life. I think it admirable that Giddings, Texas, is
giving these young criminals a chance to feel the same emotions
(A Sporting Chance, Dec. 15). Allowing them to taste success
after lives of failure is a good thing. They are no doubt
learning more about themselves on the field than they would
inside a cell.
RICO LONGORIA, St. Johns, Mich.

Although I found the piece by John Ed Bradley interesting, I
was disturbed by his tone. He seemed intent on portraying the
Giddings players as disciplined and deferential young men who
are victims of a callous and unforgiving society. In his rush to
present the human side of these criminals, Bradley omitted an
important voice from his story, that of the victims. I can only
imagine the pain that a victim's family must have felt as
Bradley turned a murderer into a football hero.
SPENCER PERLMAN, Washington, D.C.

FRESH FROSH

Among the freshmen making a mark in college basketball this
season (Sudden Impact, Dec. 15), you omitted Marcus Moody at
Memphis, who, through Jan. 8, is second on the Tigers in scoring
(12.6 points a game) and hit the game-winning shot against
Oklahoma to cap off a 39-point performance on Dec. 13.
RUSTY SHAPPLEY, Durham, N.C.

COLOR PHOTO: JAY CRIHFIELD/SPURLOCK PHOTOGRAPHY INC. [Marcus Moody in game]

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)