Letters

September 20, 1998

How incredible it is to think that as three bodies lay shrouded
in the stands, the race continued.
--Ann Schach, West Burlington, Iowa

BABE RUTH

William Nack's article about Babe Ruth's historic home run chase
was a reminder of why baseball is our national pastime (The
Colossus, Aug. 24). In an age in which money and greed rule
baseball, it was nice to be reminded that there was a man who
just tried to hit homers.
NICK MALINOWSKI, Dodgeville, Wis.

In more than 30 years of visiting Gate of Heaven cemetery in
Valhalla, N.Y., I have never seen Ruth's grave without
decorations, often Little League hats, balls or scorecards. It's
touching.
LUCILLE HORNBY, Stockton, N.J.

Your claim that "no other athlete has gripped the nation the way
Babe Ruth did in 1927" is belied by the fact that on the day that
he was to clout his record-tying home run, there were fewer than
8,000 people in the stands.
RICHARD PERKINS, Stamford, Conn.

I'm tired of hearing about Ruth. What kind of role model was he?
He was a drunk and a womanizer.
DUSTIN COLEMAN, Southville, Ky.

THE BULL'S BUM RAP

The mention of Greg Luzinski in your SCORECARD (Aug. 24) item
about hiding weak glovemen in left or rightfield was misguided.
The Bull led National League outfielders with a .993 fielding
percentage in 1973 (two errors in 262 chances). Yes, he probably
shouldn't have been in leftfield in the ninth inning of Game 3 of
the '77 National League Championship Series to have Manny Mota's
drive bounce off his glove, but he probably also should have had
it. As for Luzinski's stance with his back to the plate, I recall
its being with his back more towards centerfield, as if to tell
his teammate, the fleet-footed Garry (Secretary of Defense)
Maddox, "you take care of everything back there."
BOB VETRONE JR., Cherry Hill, N.J.

--Luzinski's back sometimes faced centerfield and sometimes home,
depending on the game situation and the batter. --ED.

CHAMPIONS FOR CHRIST

While you will get many letters critical of the skepticism
exhibited in your article on Curtis Enis and Champions for Christ
(Leap of Faith, Aug. 24), one has to be suspicious of a group
that devotes itself to that oft-neglected flock, athletes in the
top tax bracket. If CFC succeeds, and with 10% tithes I'd bet on
it, it could be the forebear for an array of new ministries:
Supermodels for Christ, Game Show Hosts for Christ and, the
ultimate, Bill Gates for Christ.
MIKE BENNETT, Chicago

After reading the article on Enis and Champions for Christ, I was
reminded of advice from my grandfather many years ago: "The
louder the Glory! Hallelujah! the tighter you should hold on to
your wallet."
BOB FLATER, Baltimore

I'm writing as the vice president of Champions for Christ and as
Greg Ball's close friend for the past 17 years--but, more
important, as the first pro athlete to become a part of CFC. Not
only has Greg Ball been an ordained and licensed minister for the
past 18 years, but he also has been a man of the highest personal
integrity.
A.C. GREEN, forward, Dallas Mavericks

As a guest at the wedding, I was not stunned by Enis's comments,
nor would I characterize his toast as unsettling. What you
describe as a tongue-lashing was a challenge to family and
friends to serve God without compromise.
GAYLON BOYD, Dallas

While you question Greg Feste's ability to act as an agent
because of lack of experience, were I a pro player, I'd rather
have him representing me than a secular agent worried about money
and not focused on the important things: Jesus Christ, family and
happiness.
SHANE T. JOHNSON, Cheyenne, Wyo.

STOPPING THE RACE

Thank you Rick Reilly for showing us that Ken Fox was more than
just the name of one of the victims at the Michigan Speedway on
July 26 (Next Time, Stop the Freaking Race, Aug. 17). He was a
human being with a family and friends. It's a shame that CART and
Michigan Speedway officials did not see him and the other victims
in the same light.
RODNEY HANNAH, Jonesboro, Ark.

When I heard about the deaths during the U.S. 500, I wondered why
the race hadn't been stopped. Then I realized officials at
Michigan Speedway had made the correct decision. Aside from the
spectators killed, six fans were hospitalized. Those familiar
with the track know that only a few roads lead out of there.
Stopping the race would have caused mass confusion, and the
ambulances would have had difficulty getting to the hospital.
ROBYN KEMPER, Novi, Mich.

B/W PHOTO: NATIONAL BASEBALL HALL OF FAME LIBRARY [Babe Ruth]

BABE COULD PITCH

Although everybody talks about his home runs, I'm still impressed
with Ruth's pitching stats. In 1916 he led the American League in
earned run average (1.75) and shutouts (nine).
TOM GRILL, Philadelphia

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)