Just one more reason I wish the Mariners were a National League
ball club: We'd get to see Mark Grace.
--WAYNE SALL, Marysville, Wash.

WARM AND FUZZY CUB

Although I am not a Chicago Cubs fan, I enjoyed Steve Rushin's
piece on Mark Grace (A State of Grace, Oct. 5). Despite a
distinguished career, Grace has been overlooked when profiles of
baseball stars have been written. This article makes up for those
oversights.
CHUCK WASHBURN, San Jose

Grace laments the Cubs' decision to let Greg Maddux go (as does
every Cubs fan). I just hope I never read an interview with Kerry
Wood in which Wood laments a decision down the road by Chicago
not to give Grace the contract he deserves.
DAVID GELLER, Los Angeles

Rushin could have mentioned that Grace played at San Diego
State. Aztecs coach Jim Dietz's excellent baseball program
surely must lead the majors in first basemen produced, with the
Tigers' Tony Clark and the Diamondbacks' Travis Lee, as well as
Grace.
ROGER CONLEE, San Diego

I used to baby-sit this kid who always made fun of the crush I
had on Mark Grace. Thanks for reminding me why I like him so
much. He's your friendly, neighborhood first baseman.
RACHEL LANGE, Lexington, Ky.

Eight pages dedicated to Mark Grace, who symbolizes the Cubs'
mediocrity these many years? Four million dollars a year to a guy
who's probably the slowest first baseman in the National League?
JOHN GROVE, Wheaton, Ill.

PENALTY SHOTS

Your Fast Fact on the Senators in the NHL preview issue
downplays Ottawa's success in the playoffs last year by
mentioning its .308 winning percentage since 1990-91, the worst
in the NHL (Scouting Reports, Oct. 12). On a more positive note,
the Senators are the only NHL team to improve their winning
percentage every year since 1992-93.
DANIEL TREMBLAY, Victoria, B.C.

How can Johnette Howard do a scouting report on the Philadelphia
Flyers and not mention John LeClair, the man who carried the
Flyers to the playoffs?
MARC A. VARRICCHIONE, Mansfield, Mass.

TOUGH CUSTOMERS?

It's about time NHL players are recognized as the toughest in
sports (Stitches in Time, Oct. 12). While baseball players ask
out of games when they get blisters, and football players sit on
the bench when they suffer turf toe, NHL players continue to
play through pain.
LEE HAMILTON, Golden, B.C.

Pardon me for not getting choked up with admiration for hockey
players who do their job despite injury. Playing through pain is
a way of life for police officers, firefighters, military
personnel, construction workers, miners and many other working
people. Not one of them earns a six- or seven-figure income for
his efforts.
MICHELLE WILDER LARSON, Union, Mo.

FAN BASHING

You gave unwarranted prominence in SCORECARD (Oct. 12) to
Phoenix ophthalmologist Alan Gordon's complaint about a 10%
increase in the price of his Arizona Diamondbacks season tickets
for next year. Gordon could save money by opting for something
more modest than the $50 seats he bought for 1998. As an $8.50
ticket buyer whose seats will cost $9 next year, I watch the
same game Gordon does, and I'm willing to make a 240-mile
round-trip from Tucson to do it.
STEVE EMERINE, Tucson

FINAL QUIP FROM THE QUIZ

As a Kansas City baseball fan for more than 40 years, I enjoyed
your article about the late Dan Quisenberry (Scorecard, Oct. 12).
In reading the quotes attributed to Quiz, I noticed there was a
memorable one left out. He once said, "I found a delivery in my
flaw."
BOB ALLEN, Cassville, Mo.

QUARTERBACK WITH A PAST

It's great to see that some NFL team finally appreciates the
talents of former University of Washington quarterback Chris
Chandler (Home at Last, Oct. 12). Huskies fans fondly remember
Chandler's first game as a starter, on Nov. 16, 1985, when he
drove Washington 98 yards in the final four minutes to secure a
come-from-behind victory over favored Southern Cal. We knew then
that Chris was not just a talented player but also a winner.
BECKY FOX, Tacoma, Wash.

COLOR PHOTO: RICH CLARKSON [Magic Johnson playing basketball for Michigan State University]

MAGIC NUMBERS

In the Oct. 12 SCORECARD you note that the $7,932,000 asking
price for Magic Johnson's Beverly Hills home intentionally had
the 32 inserted to commemorate his jersey number. The 79 is also
fitting because the Michigan State team he played for as a
sophomore won the NCAA championship in 1979.
DAVID HESSE, Eau Claire, Wis.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)