Letters

March 15, 1999

If you can see Lawrence Taylor in Canton, why can't you see Pete
Rose in Cooperstown?
--GARY JORGENSEN, Wagram, N.C.

DOINGS DOWN UNDER

Thank you for impartially reporting on the Australian Open's
dramatic turns on and off the tennis courts (Coming Out Party,
Feb. 8). Tim Layden's article uncovered events I was unaware of.
Cheers to Amelie Mauresmo, whose behavior makes her more of a
woman than her finals opponent, Martina Hingis, will ever be.
WILL POLLOCK, Atlanta

For somebody who was named after openly gay tennis champion
Martina Navratilova, Hingis has a lot to learn about kindness,
acceptance and grace. I am insulted by her intolerance. I look
forward to the day when Mauresmo sends Hingis packing--maybe to
the mall to buy a less garish dress.
RACHEL KUENY, Brooklyn

It's nice to see that Layden slipped a few paragraphs about
tennis into his article. I mean, one would hate to see a story
based on gossip about homosexuality, Anna Kournikova's "hormonal
frenzy" fans, the color of Hingis's dress and a whole bunch of
he-said, she-saids. For a while there I wasn't sure if I was
reading Teen magazine or SI.
ANIL BHARGAVA, Kent, Ohio

INFORMED ELECTORS?

According to your Taylor Takes a Giant Step item (SCORECARD,
Feb. 8), the Pro Football Hall of Fame voters were split on
whether to elect Lawrence Taylor to the Hall because of his
behavior off the field. Was O.J. Simpson forced to withdraw from
the Hall? What LT has done off the field, good or bad, cannot
erase his accomplishments on it.
FRED EBEL, Newfield, N.Y.

Do you mean that a pro football player who is a rapist, murderer
or terrorist can be and should be elected to the Hall of Fame?
I'm no puritan, but those 24 voters who turned thumbs-down on
amending the bylaws to make them stricter are misguided. The
voters' action is the cop-out of the century!
DAN POPPERS, Rancho Mirage, Calif.

TRIO WITH BRIO

As an educator and a former coach, I applaud your articles about
the three college basketball players who overcame adversity by
combining hard work and a positive attitude to achieve successes
in their lives (INSIDE COLLEGE BASKETBALL, Feb. 8).
Northwestern's Evan Eschmeyer, William Jewell's Larry Hall and
Sitapha Savane of the Naval Academy should be commended. I wish
every young student-athlete could hear the message that these
young men are sending. Just when I was convinced that our
athletic system was going down the tubes, these three restored
my faith.
WILLIAM HEYSER JR., Millersville, Pa.

SOLDIER IN ARNIE'S ARMY

Despite what you may believe, seeing Arnold Palmer in the Senior
Skins Game was far from embarrassing (SCORECARD, Feb. 8). On my
television I saw a man with the courage to beat cancer, the
vision to bring golf to a new level of popularity and the
inherent class to show us how the game should be played. That he
won no skins was disappointing, but to those of us whose love of
golf has been enhanced by Palmer, he needs no further victories
or accolades. He is already the king.
THOMAS ROLLAR, Myrtle Beach, S.C.

MISSING IN ACTION

To not include Tim Duncan or Grant Hill in your NBA
starting-over team is negligent (The Starting Over Five, Feb.
8). Duncan and Hill are popular and highly talented players who
also happen to be two of the league's best role models. They
showed that you can be an NBA superstar and still value an
education by staying in college until they got their degrees.
JOSH WILL, Pomeroy, Ohio

Kudos to Phil Taylor for pointing out that the oft-predicted
death of basketball in the post-Jordan world is nonsense.
Whenever a star player has retired, whether it was Wilt
Chamberlin, Bill Russell, Larry Bird or Magic Johnson,
commentators have proclaimed the demise of the game. Remember:
There was a time when people said, "Who's Jordan?"
TIMOTHY W. FATTIG, Couch, Mo.

GREEN THUMB

Thank you for recognizing the accomplishments of Heather
Nabozny, the first female head groundskeeper in the major
leagues (INSIDE BASEBALL, Feb. 8). The staff of the Whitecaps is
proud to say that our organization had a small part in preparing
Heather for her success. I also think stories like this signal
that baseball is reaching out to all members of society.
SCOTT LANE
General Manager
West Michigan Whitecaps
Comstock Park, Mich.

COLOR PHOTO: NEIL LEIFER

HISTORY LESSON

LAWRENCE TAYLOR is neither the first nor the most notable
candidate to be almost blindsided at the threshold of the Hall
of Fame. The same kind of morality police nearly did in Jim
Brown (32), the greatest runner in NFL history, in 1971. I know
because as sports editor of the Oakland Tribune, I was a voter
at that time.
GEORGE ROSS, Graeagle, Calif.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)