Search

Letters

June 07, 1999
June 07, 1999

Table of Contents
June 7, 1999

Faces In The Crowd

Letters

I don't follow the NBA, but I thought that the kid who changed
the game was Jordan, not Garnett.
--Phil Wilke, Lawrence, Kans.

This is an article from the June 7, 1999 issue

LIGHTNING ROD

Does Kevin Garnett's agent Eric Fleisher listen to himself when
he talks (Howlin' Wolf, May 3)? He states he has never seen
anyone Garnett's age with the maturity he believes Garnett
possesses. Yeah, the maturity that balks at a six- year, $102
million offer from the Timberwolves so he could negotiate a
sweeter deal. This sounds like the quintessential self-serving
athlete to me.
JON WHITE, Fessenden, N.Dak.

The day Garnett turned down the $102 million offer, I swore off
the NBA. I am happier to be a college basketball fan now because
Garnett never had anything to do with the college game.
DAN SMITH, Long Beach, Calif.

Kevin Garnett? Someone who has yet to accomplish anything in his
profession? This article is a Sign That the Apocalypse Is Upon
Us.
HANK SNIDER, Seattle

The cover billing should have read THE AGENT WHO CHANGED THE GAME
instead of THE KID WHO CHANGED THE GAME.
REESE RICHARDS, Sandy, Utah

I find it unfortunate that you chose to banner Garnett's
statement "I'll kill you before I let you take advantage of me."
Rather than condemning such reckless statements for what they
are--the petty musings of a spoiled brat--you chose to treat
Garnett as some kind of hero.
J. RAFF, Bossier City, La.

CAUTIONARY TALE

The heartwarming story of Laura Baugh's road to recovery from
alcoholism (Beneath the Glitter, May 3) should be an inspiration
to millions who encounter this disease but who are in denial and
fearful of receiving help. Whether or not Baugh wins on the LPGA
tour is secondary. Having an opportunity to continue to live and
remain abstinent is victory in itself.
GARY J. SAUKA, Nazareth, Pa.

I'm not sure I want to read another story by a semicelebrity
about being a drunk. Aside from giving the Betty Ford Center
publicity, this tale is about the ignorance of the public and the
medical profession about chemical dependence. We have had too
many public confessions, and then we read about the relapses.
RON YOUNGREN, Sacramento

Baugh's writing this book is an exercise in MEism. She barely
mentions her seven kids.
ALEC MILNE, Calgary, Alberta

BRIGHT, SHINING MOMENT

My most enjoyable memory of Denver Broncos quarterback John
Elway's last season occurred in the second half of the
Broncos-Jets AFC Championship Game (Last Call, May 3). With
Denver trailing 10-0, Elway completed a long pass to get the
Broncos into scoring position. On the replay the camera showed
him running down the field after the completion clapping his
hands and smiling like a kid who had just done something great
in a peewee game. That's what I'll miss most about Elway, his
zest for each contest.
ALAN MAGILL, New York City

Jordan retires, cover story next week. Gretzky retires, cover
story next week. Elway retires, a cover story on Kevin Garnett.
Elway receives a small blurb in the upper-lefthand corner. Is
that fitting for a man who orchestrated 47 come-from-behind
victories, quarterbacked five AFC Champions, won two Super Bowl
rings and a Super Bowl MVP award and finished his career in first
or second place in almost every major statistical category?
MICHAEL J. ROWE, Highlands Ranch, Colo.

PURE HEART

When the tragedy at Columbine High in Littleton occurred, I
looked forward to Rick Reilly's column (THE LIFE OF REILLY, May
3), knowing he would find a way to comment on what has affected
us all so deeply. I was not disappointed. His remarks on coach
Dave Sanders brought even more tears to my eyes. Thank you so
much for showing the nation what a truly wonderful man Dave was.
WILLIAM ROLVOGT, Wheat Ridge, Colo.

A nasty 90-mph splitter, great peripheral vision, a 36-inch
vertical jump. These are all good things to have. In the only
game that really counts, though, Coach Sanders showed he had the
right stuff.
BRIAN D. WEISS, Raleigh

COLOR PHOTO: JOHN BIEVER

GARNETT IS A JEWEL

Having coached against Kevin Garnett's team in high school in
South Carolina, I find it refreshing to see that although he may
have changed the landscape of the NBA and its salary structure,
he has remained unchanged in many ways (Howlin' Wolf, May 3).
Garnett (above left) has not let success go to his head and
shows that he appreciates those who are really important in his
life.
JIM GEYER, Knoxville, Tenn.