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Letters

Sept. 20, 1999
Sept. 20, 1999

Table of Contents
Sept. 20, 1999

U.S. Open
Baseball [bonus Piece]

Letters

I'll explain Einstein's theory of relativity if you can explain
how a story on roller coasters gets into a sports magazine.
--VINCE LAMARCA, Oviedo, Fla.

This is an article from the Sept. 20, 1999 issue Original Layout

BARRY'S SHIFTIEST MOVE

I've always admired Barry Sanders because he let his superb
moves do his talking (Out Like a Lamb, Aug. 9). If his desire to
retire was genuine, then he should have walked away with his
head up, but instead he chose to blame his coach, the Lions and
the hassling over his $36 million contract. The whining
tarnished his brilliant career.
JAMES LOCKWOOD, Marysville, Ohio

Why do people want to canonize Sanders? He had to know the Lions
were not Super Bowl contenders when he re-signed with them two
years ago. Frustrated with losing, he failed to respond to his
coach's calls and delayed his retirement announcement until all
the desirable free-agent running backs were signed by other
teams. He may have been a great running back, but he betrayed
his franchise, his teammates and his fans.
DAVID MOORE, Baton Rouge

The only thing worse for the NFL than Barry Sanders's retiring
would be if he came back next year with Master P representing him.
TROY LEECH, Normal, Ill.

SEAT BELTS, PLEASE

I had just returned from Busch Gardens in Williamsburg, Va.,
when I opened my issue of SI and saw the article on roller
coasters (High Rollers, Aug. 9). I experienced the same feeling
reading Steve Rushin's story that I got riding Apollo's Chariot,
Loch Ness Monster and Big Bad Wolf. From the first time I rode a
roller coaster, at the old Palisades Amusement Park in New
Jersey, I was hooked, and now my mission is to ride as many of
Rich Rodriguez's top 10 as possible.
ELLIOT GALDY, Durham, N.C.

Too bad Rushin didn't mention the new coaster Cedar Point is
building for its 2000 season: 310 feet tall, 80 degree drop,
estimated 92 mph. Repeat after me: YEEE-haaa!
DAVE AND TYLER PRASHAW, Massena, N.Y.

RICKY'S RISKY BUSINESS

Thanks to Rick Reilly for having the guts to write about the
stupid contract Ricky Williams signed with the New Orleans
Saints (THE LIFE OF REILLY, Aug. 9). I wonder if Williams filed
a police report after he signed the deal, because he surely got
robbed. They probably took his wallet too.
EZRA DAVID TAFESSE, Tucson

Reilly should commend Williams for having the integrity to sign
a contract that will pay him based on performance. If more
athletes were that unselfish, maybe more people would be able to
afford to go to a pro sporting event.
TRACY BLOOM, Santa Monica, Calif.

How can SI criticize athletes who demand outrageous salaries
before they even step onto the field as a pro (like J.D. Drew)
and then belittle Williams because he signed a contract that will
pay him big-time bucks only if he becomes a big-time performer?
CHAD MORROW, Harvey, La.

This kid is going to earn his money by becoming one of the best
running backs in the league, period.
STEVE ALBANESE, Strongsville, Ohio

Maybe now the Saints will be able to afford to sign some talent
that will help Williams reach the goals in his incentive clauses.
DOUGLAS KEDDY, Calgary

CRITIC'S CORNER

I agree with Steve Rushin's choice of Caddyshack as the greatest
sports movie of all time (SI VIEW, Aug. 9). I would add one more
criterion for choosing the best in sports cinema: Forget the
sequels. The follow-ups to The Bad News Bears and Caddyshack
were on a par with The Harlem Globetrotters on Gilligan's Island.
TOM MICHELOTTI, Montclair, N.J.

Was Rushin out of the country or just out of his mind during the
late 1980s, when three of the best baseball movies were
released? He missed Field of Dreams, Bull Durham and Major
League--a film that thumbed its nose at the national pastime and
was as funny as Caddyshack.
DANIEL J. KUDULIS, Bolingbrook, Ill.

WADE OWES IT TO THE WALL

Wade Boggs reached the 2,000 hit mark nearly 15 months before
Tony Gwynn (Single Minded, Aug. 9). However, he left the Red Sox
shortly thereafter, and Gwynn beat him to 3,000 hits. Boggs's
gaudy numbers are primarily the result of his years tattooing
the Green Monster in Fenway. Gwynn is by far the better player.
Boggs should feel grateful to be mentioned in the same breath.
GUS SANCHEZ, San Diego

COLOR PHOTO: AFP PHOTO/PATRICK KOVARIK

AMERICAN HERO

LEIGH MONTVILLE's article on Lance Armstrong was great (Tour de
Amerique, Aug. 9). Not only did Armstrong return to cycling
after near-fatal cancer, but he also won the Tour de France.
Amazing.
JASON SPURLOCK, St. Albans, W.Va.