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Letters

May 29, 2000
May 29, 2000

Table of Contents
May 29, 2000

Letters

I have only good words to say about Keyshawn Johnson: Good luck,
goodbye and good riddance!
--BILL WILSON, Norwalk, Conn.

This is an article from the May 29, 2000 issue Original Layout

The Buc Stops Here

As a Jets fan for too many years, I read your article on Keyshawn
Johnson, hoping that he would say something petulant or immature,
something that would ease the pain of his departure (Key Figure,
April 24). What I got instead were insightful comments about the
New York front office, especially about coach Al Groh. If Groh
did make the comments attributed to him, he's an ass who knows
nothing about leading the athletes in his charge.
JOHN HICKS, Rochester, N.Y.

Old Me-Shawn really stuck it to the Jets, didn't he? The Bucs
promise a $52 million contract extension to a wide receiver
other than Randy Moss, and SI thinks the Jets got taken to the
cleaners? When a team without a quarterback pays that kind of
money for a me-first wide receiver, I think we know who got stuck.
KEITH STEPHEN, Strongsville, Ohio

Bill Parcells extended a big helping hand to his friend, Green
Bay general manager Ron Wolf, when Johnson was sent to Tampa Bay.
By doing so, Parcells has introduced a cancer to the Bucs, who
were ready to win the Lombardi Trophy.
MIKE TOUSCANY, Pittsburgh

I am sick of players saying it is management's fault for not
renegotiating a contract. It is a contract. If Keyshawn wanted to
get more money based on his performance, he should not have
signed a long-term agreement.
LARRY BAULD, Rochester, N.Y.

Call for a Recount

How could you omit Maverick Michael Finley from your All-NBA team
(INSIDE THE NBA, April 24)? Since making your midseason
first-team all-league roster, Finley played more minutes per game
than any other player in the NBA and from March 10 until the end
of the season led Dallas to the league's second-best record.
HARDY STRAIN, Grand Prairie, Texas

You have the unmitigated gall to put down Cleveland's Shawn Kemp
by calling him the biggest waste of talent in the NBA while
honoring the childish Steve Francis as Rookie of the Year? You
laud a player who pouted, whined and complained until Vancouver
had no choice but to trade him. Francis will be asking out of
Houston when things start going sour there.
JON WHITE, Fessenden, N.Dak.

Kevin Garnett only second team? Give me a break! He became only
the ninth player in NBA history to average at least 20 points,
10 rebounds and five assists for a season. He was also in the
top 10 in scoring and top five in rebounding. I'll take him over
Grant Hill any day.
TIM SCHUCHARD, St. Cloud, Minn.

Long Live Phys Ed

Thank you, Jack McCallum, for describing so well what is the case
at so many schools today (Gym Class Struggles, April 24). It
reminded me that I went through hell in my junior high's physical
education program (run by former Marines) and of the absence of
anything similar in high school. Despite running track and
cross-country in high school, I was never in as good shape then
as I was when I left junior high.
KEVIN WESTERVELT, Modesto, Calif.

I always think it's ironic that students at the school where I
teach pay big bucks to belong to a fancy new health club to do
what they can do for free at school in physical education class.
STAN OBERG, Lafayette, Calif.

We here at the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports
applaud your article drawing attention to the decline in the
quality of physical education in America's schools. Our policy of
recognizing students who take part in the President's Challenge
Physical Fitness Awards Program reflects our commitment to
encouraging children to engage in regular physical activity. Our
fitness tests are designed to allow children with disabilities or
little interest in sports to earn recognition for physical
fitness alongside classmates who aspire to be top-notch athletes.
This is the context for our slogan, Every child is a winner in
fitness.
LEE HANEY
Chairman
President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports
Washington, D.C.

Kobe Beef

Phil Taylor is kidding himself if he believes that Kobe Bryant
isn't consumed by his own ego (Boy II Man, April 24). Bryant
would rather be the Man on a fringe contender than second fiddle
on the best team in basketball. He knows Michael Jordan had a
team built around him, and he thinks that that should be done
for him.
MARK TORRES, Philadelphia

B/W PHOTO: KEYSTONE VIEW CO.

Speaker's In the House

Your article on Cal Ripken Jr. and his 3,000th hit was excellent
(The Long Haul, April 24). One fact that was overlooked is that
Ripken is the first American League player since Tris Speaker
(above) in 1925 to collect 3,000 hits without ever having been a
designated hitter. Although the rule has been in existence
throughout Ripken's career, his first hit as a DH was his 3,017th.
EDWARD X. BRENNAN, Catonsville, Md.