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Letters

May 07, 2001
May 07, 2001

Table of Contents
May 7, 2001

Letters

If darts is a sport, then so is channel surfing.
--GREG GOODIE, Fall River, Nova Scotia

This is an article from the May 7, 2001 issue Original Layout

Bull's-eye of the Beholder

Your article by Steve Rushin about darting in England was among
the best I recall (Beers and Shots, April 2). I'm sick of the
same old guff about sore arms, bad knees and which star has how
many kids by how many girlfriends. This story has real charm. The
photos were excellent as well.
RON TALLON, Lawrenceville, Ga.

Rushin captured the color and culture of the darting world. His
story was as fun to read as it was well crafted. As someone who
has spent many hours in London pubs launching darts, I will vouch
that Rushin hit "treble tops."
MARK REED, Wantagh, N.Y.

Surely one of sport's toughest challenges is attempting to
deliver a dart from almost eight feet away into an area that
Rushin precisely describes as "smaller than a fortune-cookie
slip" in front of a raucous crowd and with millions viewing on
television.
RICHARD PART, Oshawa, Ont.

What kind of sports article is that? It didn't have one athlete
whining, crying or bellyaching. It didn't have one arrowman
asking for a lifetime contract from his pub.
BEN STEINHAUER
Versailles, Ind.

Ba-Da-Byng

Just because a player stays out of the penalty box doesn't mean
he's not tough (INSIDE THE NHL, April 9). While playing every
game this year and logging more ice time than most players, Nick
Lidstrom had only 18 penalty minutes. Most players would agree he
plays tough D.
MIKE HOFFMAN, Grand Rapids

I couldn't agree more that the Lady Byng should go. Hockey is not
a nice-guy kind of sport.
ZACH HULING, Belleville, Ill.

Unsung Spur

Thank you Chris Ballard for recognizing the contributions of
Derek Anderson to the San Antonio Spurs (Spur of the Moment,
April 2). While many people have continued to credit only Tim
Duncan and David Robinson with the Spurs' success, Anderson has
emerged as a primary scorer by slashing to the basket and hitting
the J. He helped take San Antonio to first place in the Western
Conference. Opponents in the playoffs better pay attention to
him.
BRANDON CONGER, Agoura Hills, Calif.

Child Prodigies

Rick Reilly's article about pushy sports parents made me realize
something important (THE LIFE OF REILLY, April 2). I played
sports to have fun. I lived my dream, not those of my parents. I
had a real childhood, which you can't buy with a seven-figure
salary.
CHARBEL G. BALLOUTINE, Toronto

After my son was born, I would spend days dreaming of his major
league career. When should I start pitching him some BP? However,
after reading Reilly's article, I was breathless. I started to
envision this psychologically damaged boy, just wanting to be a
kid. I don't want us to spend afternoons in therapy trying to
repair the emotional damage. So I've put the bat and ball away
(for a while).
ANTHONY ECHEVESTE, Pico Rivera, Calif.

I purchased two professional baseball bats and gloves for my
daughter. Her developmental doctor says that her hand-eye
coordination is better than A-Rod's for her age. I also hired a
contractor to clear my backyard and install a batting cage. She
was three months old on April 1. Please continue the satirical
writing.
DEVANG MEHTA, East Islip, N.Y.

Parallel Universes

It's nice to see that in your April 2 issue you gave the early
rounds of the women's NCAA basketball tournament the same kind of
coverage that you gave your swimsuit-issue models: little to
none.
ELIZABETH C. GARVEY, Pittsburgh

You Bet Your Bibby

David Sabino's list of former Mets who have pitched no-hitters
for other clubs is burned into the psyche of every Mets fan
(INSIDE BASEBALL, April 16). We usually give honorable membership
in this group to Jim Bibby, a highly regarded New York farmhand
who was traded after the 1971 season before he played a game for
the parent club. Two years later he no-hit the world champion A's
while pitching for the Rangers.
JIM MEYERS, Lancaster, Pa.

B/W PHOTO: HOCKEY HALL OF FAME

Thugs Need Not Apply

It's not the Lady Byng that should be given the door but the kind
of thinking expressed in Kostya Kennedy's column. No one accused
Bill Quackenbush (above) of not playing good defense when he went
through the 1948-49 season without a penalty, made the All-Star
team and, yes, won the Lady Byng.
ROGER A. GODIN, St. Paul