Letters

May 27, 2001

Lightning Rods

The story about Allen Iverson and Larry Brown of the 76ers moved
me (Mama's Boys, April 23). The article transcends basketball
because it promotes understanding between cultures.
WENDELL SMITH, Providence

Gary Smith's piece was as much an anthem for resolving
differences worldwide as it was the story of Iverson and Brown.
It's a beacon of hope for a world otherwise overwhelmed with
intolerance, ignorance and prejudice.
TIMOTHY BUCKLEY, Maple Shade, N.J.

You should charge extra for every issue with a story by Gary
Smith.
WILLIAM E. GREFFIN, Oak Park, Ill.

Your article made me a fan of both Iverson and Brown--the mothers,
that is. I'm still not too fond of their sons.
JOHN RAPOPORT, White Plains, N.Y.

After seeing the photo of Brown on the Carolina Cougars' bench, I
can't believe he could criticize Iverson's taste in clothing.
RON ANDERSON, Glen Ellyn, Ill.

Are we to laud Iverson for taking care of his family while his
public behavior is that of someone who rejects authority figures?
Are we to feel Brown's pain as he searches for the perfect place
where everything is done the Right Way? Iverson, with his
offensive rap lyrics, has alienated many fans who would admire
his court skills. Brown has moved so often that we expect his
tenure with any team to be short.
MICHAEL STOWE, El Paso

How beautiful, the immaculate conception of Iverson. Perhaps the
Vatican let him borrow that cross he was wearing around his neck.
BOBBY REESE, Henderson, Nev.

Regarding your April 23rd cover shot of Iverson, thanks for
reminding me why I'm no longer a fan of the NBA.
RUSSELL WEEDEN, Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

If someone were concocting an anti-NBA marketing campaign, there
stands the poster boy.
CHRIS MATHISON, Miami

Fade to Black

As a Torontonian who has never been fond of Vancouver and the
sorry Grizzlies franchise, I must admit that Steve Rushin's
column (AIR AND SPACE, April 23) made me reconsider my
sentiments. Clearly Vancouver deserves better than such a
miserable team.
NATHAN KALMAN-LAMB, Toronto

Thanks for giving Vancouver basketball fans credit for supporting
our Grizzlies. The real story of the franchise's failure is one
of greed and deception. The fans supported the Grizzlies in the
hopes that one day we would reap a competitive team. Shortly
after Michael Heisley bought the team a little over a year ago,
he said, "Together with the fans and the partners of the
Vancouver Grizzlies, we are going to build a winning tradition
for this franchise. I will not accept anything else." We believed
him. Talk about your stupid fans, eh?
BRENNAN LEFFLER, Vancouver

Thank heavens it was only a basketball team and not another one
of our Canadian NHL franchises.
JASON SCHROEDER, Edmonton

Electoral College

MVP of the NBA, Tim Duncan (INSIDE THE NBA, April 23)? Are you
watching the same NBA I am? I see Allen Iverson dominating at
both ends of the court, leading the league in scoring and steals
per game. As for the point that without Duncan the Spurs lost in
the first round of the playoffs last season, I say that without
Iverson the Sixers would be battling for the worst record in the
NBA.
BRENT BEDDIS, North Wales, Pa.

You chose Tracy McGrady as Most Improved Player? What about Peja
Stojakovic? He went from relatively unknown sub to star in a
matter of months. Why do you think the Kings traded Corliss
Williamson?
MARCUS RHINEHEART, Paris, Ark.

Beg to Differ

Your story on the Goodwill Games in SCORECARD (April 30) failed
to present a balanced view of our financial background. As a
wholly owned and operated property of Turner Sports, the Games do
not charge a rights fee to air our product on TNT, a significant
form of revenue for most traditional sports owners. Also, the $30
million price tag that you speculated would be AOL Time Warner's
share of the cost of the 2001 Goodwill Games is well above our
projections.
MICHAEL P. PLANT
President, Goodwill Games Inc.
Atlanta

B/W PHOTO: NEIL LEIFER

Traveler from the East

I was surprised to see that you did not mention Masanori Murakami
(right), who is the real pioneer of Japanese players making it to
the major leagues (Rising Sons, April 23). He pitched for the San
Francisco Giants in 1964 and '65, going 5-1 and earning nine
saves before returning to Japan.
TODD M. GRIFFITH, San Jose

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)