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Letters

Dec. 03, 2001
Dec. 03, 2001

Table of Contents
Dec. 3, 2001

Si Adventure

Letters

Traveling Violation

This is an article from the Dec. 3, 2001 issue Original Layout

Please, SI readers in the Bay Area, call your local police,
sheriff and highway patrol about Gilbert Arenas and his
345-horsepower, 5,500-pound Cadillac Escalade (SCORECARD, Nov.
5) so they can impound the vehicle and suspend Airhead's license
before he hurts himself, his friends, pedestrians and/or other
drivers with excessive sound-pressure levels and dangerous
driver distractions.
ROBERT TRAVIS, San Antonio

Arenas should learn the lesson that owners of sports franchises
have missed: Just because you can afford to buy something
doesn't mean that you should.
DAN HEINZERLING, Dallas

You got a couple of items in SCORECARD mixed up. This Week's
Sign of the Apocalypse should have been Gilbert Arenas's SUV.
How better to announce the end of civilization as we know it
than with 5,000 watts of rap blaring down the street?
JAMES OLSKI, Appleton, Wis.

Unhappy Valley

You couldn't even put together a few sentences about beloved Joe
Paterno and his record-setting 324th victory? Only a few weeks
after most of the nation had written off Penn State, the amazing
JoePa guided the Nittany Lions to a second straight victory as
underdogs. Shame on you for neglecting to include in your
magazine one of the greatest moments in collegiate sports history.
DANIEL MATOS, University Park, Pa.

Temporary Insanity

As a loyal Red Sox fan, I finally found the reason for my
strange, out-of-place support for the Yankees in this year's
World Series. It was "Wet Behind the Ears" (THE LIFE OF REILLY,
Nov. 5) that enlightened me: Four years of existence versus 26
world titles; swimming pool in the bleachers versus Yankee
Stadium? Diamondbacks pinstripes, please! Thanks, Rick, I
thought I was losing it.
DAVID BRENNAN, West Springfield, Mass.

The Literal Truth

I literally just finished reading Steve Rushin's article and had
to write (AIR AND SPACE, Nov. 5). O.K., that's not true. I read
the article and literally scoured the pages of your magazine for
your e-mail address. O.K., that's not true either. I flipped a
few pages and located it. I did, however, find the article to be
literally hilarious. Now could you have him address the 110%,
150% and 200% effort that athletes give in pursuit of victory? I
have participated in many sports in my 46 years, have always
given 100% and usually come up short. Did I not try hard enough?
If I had given 110% or 200%, would I have made it to the big
time? Please let me know where I failed.
EDDIE KEMP, Jackson, Miss.

Rushin's column was a phenomenal way to teach my fifth-grade
students the difference between literal and figurative language.
I could literally see the lightbulbs flash over their heads.
MICHAEL BRITT, Casper, Wyo.

While reading Rushin's "Literally Clueless," I metaphorically
busted a gut, and my sides figuratively split. Thank you, Mr.
Rushin, for shedding light on what is, literally, the most
annoying aspect of athlete-speak.
ELEANOR MARQUIS, Scottsdale, Ariz.

Apparently, Steve ran out of things to write about. I found it
literally hard to read.
VINNY MICUCCI, Smithtown, N.Y.

Not the Reader's Choice

With baseball winding down, basketball and hockey starting up
and football at the height of its season, how can you waste 11
pages on the most uncouth, belligerent sociopath that the boxing
world has seen in years (The Chosen One, Nov. 5)? Zab Judah
makes Mike Tyson look like a choirboy.
RICHARD D. ASHMORE, Richardson, Texas

COLOR PHOTO: JOHN W. MCDONOUGH BEFORECOLOR PHOTO: PAUL BERESWILL [See caption above]COLOR PHOTO: JOHN BIEVER AFTERCOLOR PHOTO: DAVID E. KLUTHO [See caption above]

Uniformity

All your examples (SCORECARD, Nov. 5) are of teams that changed
their uniforms and experienced better days. The Houston Rockets,
a team that won consecutive NBA championships, in 1994 and '95,
and promptly traded in its traditional--albeit ugly--uniforms
for silly-looking pinstriped jammies, haven't had a whiff of the
Finals since.
DAVE BRADLEY, Houston

In the early 1990s the Pittsburgh Penguins won back-to-back
championships and then before the 1992-93 season changed their
uniforms and logo (probably to gain revenue). Since the Penguins
made that change, Lord Stanley has not come back to Pittsburgh.
BRIAN GEFSKY, Beverly Hills