Letters

December 02, 2002

Marvelous Marvin

When I saw that the Colts' Marvin Harrison was left off your
midseason All-Pro team (NFL MIDSEASON REPORT, Nov. 11), I could
not believe it. Eric Moulds of the Bills has been the best
all-around wideout thus far, but to put the 49ers' Terrell Owens
ahead of Harrison is preposterous. After the games of Nov. 17
Harrison leads the league in receptions and has more receiving
yards than Owens. If Owens had not drawn so much attention to
himself with the ball-signing stunt, he would be thought of as
having just another good season. From now on let's try to award
the guys who let their stats--and not their Sharpies--do the
talking.
NATE MEYL, Bryn Mawr, Pa.

Mrs. Hockey

Thanks for your fine article on Gordie and Colleen Howe (Sweet
Sorrow, Nov. 11). Colleen is a pioneer in the arena of sports
marketing, far more than most realize. She is a woman of great
vision, passionate in her beliefs and ever protective of her
husband and family. Having spent considerable time around both
her and Gordie, I have been the beneficiary of her warmth, which
was considerable, and a victim of her wrath, though that was
rare. I always found her to be fair, honest and a person of
integrity. Gordie is simply the greatest pure athlete of all
time. He personifies on a daily basis the definition of hero.
JIM BATES, Celebration, Fla.

Thanks for your wonderful story on the Howes. To most of the
world Gordie has been known only as Mr. Hockey. Now many more of
us know what a truly great person he is.
JIM FEURIG Tawas City, Mich.

Thick Woods

Rather than characterize Tiger Woods's initial response to
Augusta National's men-only policy as "wishy-washy" (SCORECARD,
Nov. 11), you should have called it not too smart. He really
should have said to the news media, "Talk to Arnold Palmer and
Jack Nicklaus, who are members of Augusta National, and whatever
their positions on the admission of women, I back them up 110
percent."
LINDSAY PATTERSON, New York City

Virtual Violence

Rick Reilly should be glad that his son is playing NFL Blitz 2003
(THE LIFE OF REILLY, Nov. 11), an Erated and fun football game,
instead of Mrated games like Grand Theft Auto: Vice City or
Hitman 2: Silent Assassin. If he thinks Blitz is too violent for
his son, he'd probably have a heart attack if he saw those other
games.
MICHAEL BROOKS, North Potomac, Md.

Full-Court Press

Regarding Sue the Coach! (SCORECARD, Nov. 11), a friend of mine,
a former high school basketball coach, said it best: "A coach's
dream job is at an orphanage."
JIM LYKE, Milton, Wis.

Shades of Brown

I had never heard of Ray Brown before, but man, do I appreciate
and respect him (AIR AND SPACE, Nov. 11). Forget the Sharpies,
self-promotion, illegal hits and fines that get so much
publicity. Ray Brown is who I want to hear about.
DENNIS GEHRKE, Racine, Wis.

Brown says that had he understood the labor issues in 1987, he
"probably" wouldn't have been a replacement player. Based on his
"probably," he still doesn't get it. He wants to tailgate in
Buffalo or Green Bay? Ray, many of those fans are hardworking
blue-collar union members who wouldn't be too thrilled to have
you with them. Time and his teammates' youth have given him a
pass on a very bad decision. Ray Brown is a scab.
STUART MORRISON, Park Hills, Ky.

Standout Guy

It's clear to me that Guy Carbonneau belongs in the Hall of Fame
(INSIDE THE NHL, Nov. 11). Although he was not among the league's
cover boys, I'd bet any one of his teammates from Montreal,
Dallas or St. Louis would give Carbonneau a team MVP vote for his
devotion to defense, face-offs, penalty-killing and all the other
"little things" that win games in the NHL.
JOHN HAMBLIN, Medway, Mass.

Mountaineer at the Summit

How could Ivan Maisel report on the reemergence of the running
back in the year of the spread offense without mentioning Avon
Cobourne and the West Virginia Mountaineers (INSIDE COLLEGE
FOOTBALL, Nov. 11)? Cobourne has more rushing yards than all but
one of the backs mentioned. The senior is already one of only
five rushers ever to run for over 1,000 yards in each of his four
college seasons. At his current pace he will finish his
undergraduate career among the top 10 rushers in the history of
Division I-A college football.
RICH SURICH, Chicago

COLOR PHOTO: SIMON BRUTY (COVER) COLOR PHOTO: RON RITTENHOUSE/THE DOMINION POST/AP AVON CALLING Cobourne broke the West Virginia records of Amos Zereoue.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)