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End of the Line? A Super Bowl hero faces jail

July 07, 2003
July 07, 2003

Table of Contents
July 7, 2003

Inside Tennis

End of the Line? A Super Bowl hero faces jail

It's not just baseball players who know that the third strike is
a bitter pill. Michael Pittman, 27, the Buccaneers' running back
you last saw celebrating his 124-yard performance in the Super
Bowl, may have a long wait before he plays his next down. Pittman
was arrested on May 31 outside his Phoenix home and charged with
two counts of felony assault on his wife, Melissa, who on
Mother's Day had given birth to their second child, a daughter.
Pittman is already on probation for two misdemeanor convictions
stemming from two June 2001 altercations with Melissa that landed
him in jail for five days. ("This is totally out of character,"
Pittman said then.) Prosecutors want Pittman's probation revoked
immediately, which would send him to jail for up to six months
and halt his $1.8 million annual salary. (He's in the second year
of a five-year, $8.8 million deal.) If convicted of the most
recent assault, Pittman--whose pretrial hearing is set for July
30--faces a minimum mandatory five-year sentence.

This is an article from the July 7, 2003 issue Original Layout

According to police reports Pittman and Melissa, who have been
married for four years, began arguing after Melissa found phone
numbers belonging to other women on Pittman's cellphone bill.
"Get the f---out of my house," Pittman allegedly said. Police say
the argument unfolded outside the house, where Pittman berated
Melissa with profanities and then rammed his Hummer into the
passenger side of Melissa's Mercedes as she tried to drive away.
Their two-year-old, Mycah, and an 18-year-old babysitter were
also in Melissa's car. The report says Melissa told officers that
"there were approximately 30 to 40 prior domestic violence
situations that were never reported." Lawyers for Pittman, who
has pleaded not guilty to the charges, refused comment.

Pittman took part in the Bucs' June minicamp at which coach Jon
Gruden told reporters, "I'm concerned about [Pittman's situation]
obviously for a lot of reasons. Not just for winning and losing,
but for the general well-being of our football players." As a
team the Bucs are preparing for the worst. Pittman was their top
back, and the Bucs had ignored running backs in the free-agent
market and with their six draft picks. But on June 13, after the
seriousness of Pittman's situation became clear, Tampa Bay traded
for Cardinals running back Thomas Jones, a potential starter who
was the No. 7 pick in 2000. As Gruden said, "Contingency plans
are part of this business."
--Lester Munson and Jeffri Chadiha

COLOR PHOTO: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/GETTY IMAGES (PITTMAN ACTION) OFFENSIVE RECORD Pittman has been convicted twice before.COLOR PHOTO: COURTESY MARICOPA COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE (MUG SHOT) [See caption above]