Big Play With Mike Hebron

May 16, 2004

Joey Sindelar could stiff a crucial four-iron at 17 and then win
in sudden death because, despite the pressure, he never lost his
impeccable rhythm

ANALYSIS

No tour player is calmer or kinder than Joey Sindelar. Whether he
makes a hole in one or shanks a shot, Sindelar is always the
same: smiling, levelheaded and gentle. You could see his
personality in the reaction to his stellar four-iron at the 17th
on Sunday. Instead of giving a fist pump or a high five, he
smiled sheepishly and covered his mouth as if to say, Gee whiz,
did I do that? That easygoing demeanor is reflected in his
mellifluous swing rhythm, which is the same for every club, from
the putter to the driver.

THE TIP

HOW TO FIND YOUR RHYTHM

Everyone's swing has a unique rhythm, and it should remain
unchanged on every shot. To learn your rhythm, time your putting
stroke. Hit putts of various lengths, counting the seconds from
the start of the stroke to impact. You'll be surprised to learn
that the duration of the stroke is the same for a three-footer as
it is for a 60-footer. That is your rhythm, and it should stay
the same on every swing--off the tee, from the fairway and on the
green.

AND ANOTHER THING ...

"The best-kept secret in golf is Friars Head, a new Ben
Crenshaw-designed course on the East End of Long Island that I
like just as much as Bethpage Black and Shinnecock Hills."

"Tiger Woods is still Number 1, and nobody else is close because
everything is measured against him."

"Coaching tour pros is good for the ego and the pocketbook, but
it's grossly overrated. Helping amateurs is infinitely more
challenging and satisfying."

Hebron teaches at Pine Needles Lodge and Golf Club in Southern
Pines, N.C., and is a Golf Magazine Top 100 Teacher.

COLOR PHOTO: ERICK W. RASCO COLOR PHOTO: COURTESY OF CBS (SINDELAR) COLOR PHOTOMONTAGE: ERICK W. RASCO; JIM GUND (BACKGROUND)

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)