Shinnecock Hills

June 20, 2004

I've been drawing course maps for 28 years and can think of only
one that I didn't sketch while seated on the bed in my RV. It was
the map of Shinnecock Hills for the 1986 U.S. Open. I did that
one while sprawled out on the velvety grass of the Sheep Meadow
in New York City's Central Park.

After I had walked and measured Shinnecock that year, Susan (her
last name is my secret), a friend and model who had recently been
on the cover of Cosmopolitan, invited me to stay with her in her
apartment on Central Park West.

"Where will I park my 20-foot rig?" I asked her.

"On the street. It's easy and free," she said.

"Won't I get mugged?" I asked.

"No chance," Susan said.

Despite the distractions of both Susan and New York City, I did
manage to get my work done.

My favorite hole at Shinnecock is the serpentine 16th, a doomsday
reckoning for long and short hitters alike. It's reachable in
two, but anyone who tries to force a birdie will crash and burn.
Two-foot-tall fescue surrounds the entire hole and is instant
death to anyone who hits into it. Off the tee there's a downslope
beginning 285 yards out that deflects balls into the bunker on
the left. Laying up is no cinch, either, because there are five
bunkers to the left of the fairway.

*For 28 years Gorjus George has drawn the yardage books that the
pros use.

COLOR PHOTO: DAVID WALBERG (LUCAS) B/W DIAGRAM: DIAGRAM BY GEORGE LUCAS No. 16 Par-5544 Yards

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)