What It Takes

Sept. 13, 2004
Sept. 13, 2004

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Sept. 13, 2004

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What It Takes

In cyclocross--a gritty, gonzo cousin of road racing--it's not all about the bike

Edited by Yi-Wyn Yen

Cyclocross races--riding and running (while carrying your bike) over hills and hurdles, often through rain, snow or mud--are as tough on gear as they are on athletes. Here's what reigning U.S. champ Jonathan Page will bring when he takes his 'cross talents across the pond to Europe, the birthplace of the sport, for the fall-winter season.

This is an article from the Sept. 13, 2004 issue Original Layout


Cervélo R2.5 Cyclocross ($2,399)

Cervélo is building its first cyclocross bike for me. The road version of this carbon-fiber bike has one of the lightest, yet strongest frames on the market. The 'cross bike will have a slightly more relaxed geometry and the wheelbase will be a little longer, to help me get over bumps. And the seat stays and chain stays will be wider to prevent mud and debris from collecting between the frame and the wheels.


Mavic Ksyrium ($850)

These wheels are lightweight (less than 1,500 grams for both), durable and stay true. The free wheel (the ratcheting hub on the rear wheel that holds the gear cassette) is especially problem-free. It can get clogged up very easily, which is why you need great wheels--and a great mechanic (who services the rider's bikes mid-race).


Michelin Cyclocross Mud2 ($44)

Different races require different types of tires, depending on the terrain and the conditions. You can vary the tire pressure, widths and tread patterns. You use anything you can to get the most power, the most traction, to be the quickest around the course. Overall, though, my favorite rubber is the Mud2, a knobby tire that sheds mud really well.


AdiStar XC Race ($209)

These shoes are brand-new for me, and I'm very happy with them. They have a carbon-fiber sole, which is great for power transfer on the bike, but they're not too stiff. I can run in them without having my heel popping out, which is great for getting over the barriers. Plus, they're made of a mesh-synthetic leather combo, so my feet stay cool.


Giro Atmos ($189)

In cyclocross, crashes happen. The Atmos (which combines carbon-reinforced ribs with Giro's Roll Cage technology) is very light, very breathable and has all kinds of vents (26, to be exact). It's supercomfortable, with a RocLoc 4 fit system that makes it perfectly snug.


Pedro's Ice Wax ($5.99, four-ounce bottle)

To be honest, I'll take anything I can get that keeps my rig running smooth. Ice Wax seems to work well in all conditions, early fall right through the winter. It doesn't collect a lot of dirt, and you can clean the chain easily. So after a race I'll take the pressure washer to the bike, clean it off, put some lube back on, and I'm good to go.

COLOR PHOTOJONATHAN S. MCELVERYHELLO, MUDDER Page got down and dirty on his way to the 2003 U.S. cyclocross title. SIX COLOR PHOTOS