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TEAM EFFORT

Aug. 22, 2005
Aug. 22, 2005

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Aug. 22, 2005

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TEAM EFFORT

The PGA was last call for the Presidents Cup, which has emerged as a model of principle and sportsmanship after a controversial tie

Jack Nicklaus wonders why some people "just don't get it." He can't understand why there are those who still characterize his U.S. team's tie with the Internationals in the 2003 Presidents Cup as a letdown, a kissing-your-sister dud. Did television somehow filter out the drama? Did the cameras not capture that unprecedented twilight playoff between Ernie Els and Tiger Woods? Did the naysayers not see the excited fans scrambling over the raw dunes of South Africa's Links at Fancourt or hear their exultant yelps as they climbed the steep slope to the clubhouse in the gathering dark?

This is an article from the Aug. 22, 2005 issue Original Layout

"I think maybe you had to be there to recognize what it meant to the game of golf," Nicklaus said after stopping by Baltusrol on the eve of the PGA for a press conference and an 18th-hole ceremony commemorating two of his four U.S. Open titles. "People were arm in arm, they were singing as they came away from the greens. Everyone was absolutely ecstatic." Nicklaus then repeated what he has been saying for almost two years: "I think it was the most special event I have ever been involved with."

That's a strong statement, coming from a man who has won 18 major championships and represented the U.S. in two Walker Cups, a World Amateur Team Championship, six World Cups and six Ryder Cups. Nicklaus has also captained two Ryder Cup teams, and his captaincy at this year's Presidents Cup, which will be held Sept. 23-25 at the Robert Trent Jones Golf Club in Lake Manassas, Va., will be his third and final one at the biennial event the PGA Tour launched in 1994 (rosters, page G20). Nicklaus is also confident that his agreement with International captain Gary Player to stop the playoff and share the Cup--amid a mob of players, caddies and officials on the 2nd green after Els and Woods had halved three holes of sudden death--will stand the test of time.

Jerry Kelly, who was 2-2 for the U.S. at Fancourt, thinks the captains got it right. "We all wanted to win more than anything," Kelly said last week after a first-round 70 at Baltusrol, "but we understood what sharing the Cup would do for the game and for South Africa. It was an important statement about where the world is going." No one who was there, Kelly elaborated, could have failed to be moved by the appearance of Republic of South Africa president Thabo Mbeki with former presidents Nelson Mandela and F.W. de Klerk, the dismantlers of apartheid.

Charles Howell, who split four matches as Woods's partner before beating Australia's Adam Scott 5 and 4, ducked the political implications and simply gushed, "It was the first time I had ever played in a team event, and it was incredible. You couldn't write a story any better. Awesome!"

It seems, though, that only those who were actually at Fancourt, whether playing, watching or sipping champagne between bites of chocolate-dipped strawberries, recall how compelling the competition really was. The Internationals--the best pros in the world from anywhere other than Europe or the U.S.--trailed 9 1/2-6 1/2 after two days but swept the Saturday four-ball matches 6-0. (Els, playing only a few miles from his vacation home on the Garden Route, thrilled the locals by winning consecutive matches with walk-off eagles.) The Americans rallied in the Sunday singles, Woods taming Els 4 and 3 while Kenny Perry held off Zimbabwe's Nick Price, one up. (Nice guy Price broke his putter over his knee in anguish when his six-footer for birdie failed to drop on the final hole.) Kelly, who trailed Durban-born Tim Clark for most of the day, won his match with a birdie on 18 and got a Bear hug from his captain. "That," said Kelly, "is something I'll take with me forever."

The U.S. trailed by a point with two matches to be decided, and both reached the 18th hole. In the first Nicklaus walked into the fairway to tell Chris DiMarco, "I need your point." DiMarco came through, defeating Stuart Appleby one up, but afterward DiMarco said, "I had the biggest lump I've ever had in my throat." That dumped all the pressure on Davis Love III and Australia's Robert Allenby. Love, one up through 17, showed the strain by chunking a difficult chip and bogeying the final hole for a halve. Under a Presidents Cup rule that has since been revoked because of the Fancourt precedent (ties will stand), the captains opened sealed envelopes and read off the names of the players they had preselected to break a tie. The names, to no one's surprise, were Ernie Els and Tiger Woods.

Hardly anyone, it must be admitted, anticipated such a great show. Before South Africa, the Presidents Cup was regarded as a wan copy of the Ryder Cup, the biennial dustup between the pros of the U.S. and Europe. The American players groused that it was unfair to expect them to disrupt their schedules, travel great distances, don a coat and tie and listen to long-winded speeches every single autumn. What's more, with the exception of the one-point U.S. victory in 1996, all the Presidents Cups had been blowouts. For those reasons--and because a trip to South Africa is a budget-buster--only a handful of American journalists made the trip. The European press, having no dogs in the fight, stayed away too.

Their loss. The playoff between Els and Woods, which began on the 18th hole, produced nothing but scrambling pars, but with 10,000 spectators lining the fairways and Hall of Famers Nicklaus and Player sharing the stage, it took on the aura of a classic battle. Woods would later describe the playoff as "nerve-racking," and Els would say it was "probably the first time I've ever felt my legs shaking." On their third playoff hole, the 231-yard par-3 2nd, Woods had a climbing-dropping-twisting 15-footer for par. When the ball dropped, his emphatic arm pump was illuminated by dozens of camera flashes. ("Tiger's final putt made my hair stand up," recalls Jeff Sluman, whom Nicklaus recently reappointed as his assistant captain.) Els, with the weight of Africa on his shoulders, then made his six-footer for the halve. And that, Nicklaus and Player decided, was where it should end.

The decision to share the Cup, while controversial at the time, seems in retrospect to have given the Presidents Cup a nice patina of principle and sportsmanship. The Ryder Cup, by way of contrast, has been marred by a decade of gamesmanship, chauvinism, loutish crowd behavior and endless finger-pointing. "Every event has its own character," Nicklaus said last week, "but South Africa was so great that I hope the Ryder Cup would learn a lesson from it. These are basically goodwill events. They're for bragging rights, that's all. That's the spirit the Ryder Cup should be played in."

South Africa's afterglow was still discernable at the PGA, where the top-rated American players eyed the Presidents Cup points list to see if they would qualify on points or squeak in as captain's picks. "I'd have to really mess up not to make it," said Stewart Cink, who started the week ranked eighth among the American pros, "but I wanted to play well enough to feel safe." (Cink finished 28th at Baltusrol and made the team.) Ted Purdy, on the other hand, had seen his chances fade the week before when he withdrew from the International to attend an ultrasound exam in Phoenix with his wife, Arlene, who is pregnant with their second child. He dropped to 14th in the final standings. "Family's first and golf is a distant fourth or fifth," Purdy said.

Even John Daly, whose aversion to a coat and tie has discouraged previous captains from knocking on the door of his RV, spoke of his desire to play in Virginia. Smoking a cigarette in the Baltusrol parking lot after a second-round 69, Daly said, "Hey, I'd even go to the dinners." But Daly probably didn't impress Nicklaus the next day when he damaged his putter, causing him to putt with an L wedge while shooting a 78.

The jockeying ended on Monday, when Nicklaus and Player announced their captains' picks. Nicklaus chose Justin Leonard and Fred Couples, who were 11th and 17th, respectively, on the points list. Player picked Peter Lonard and Trevor Immelman, who were ranked 11th and 22nd. But even as they looked forward to the sixth Presidents Cup, the captains were still celebrating the fifth.

"Would I like to see every event end in a dead tie?" Nicklaus asked after his visit to Baltusrol. "No, I think people would get tired of that. Anyway, we all want to win. If we didn't, nobody would watch us." Again, he said, you probably had to have been at Fancourt to understand how the planets and stars and Outeniqua Mountains had somehow aligned on one November weekend to produce the perfect Presidents Cup. "Even President Mbeki wasn't sure what it was all about for a few days, but he was ecstatic by the time it ended."

Nicklaus summed up: "He got it."

View this article in the original magazine

U.S. versus Them
The Internationals won't have Ernie Els this time--he's recuperating from knee surgery--but their depth makes them a slight favorite at Lake Manassas. Here are the final rosters.

U.S.World RankPresidents Cup Record
TIGER WOODS
So-so record (he's 0-6-0 in four-balls) reflects his interest level
1st8-7-0
PHIL MICKELSON
Good match player, but goat of 2003 Presidents Cup, in which he went 0-5-0
3rd6-12-5
DAVID TOMS
Sneaky good year (he's earned about $3.5M), and he won the Match Play in February
9th1-4-0
KENNY PERRY
Kind of guy you want as a partner--consistently straight and long off the tee
11th6-3-0
CHRIS DIMARCO
Last seen losing the Masters. Has been the biggest dud of the 2005 season
13th2-3-0
JIM FURYK
Has never lost a singles match in seven Presidents or Ryder Cup tries
10th7-6-0
FRED FUNK
Kind of short, but steady and always in the fairway. Good clubhouse guy
30th1-2-1
STEWART CINK
Won't have Kirk Triplett as a partner, as in 2000. Hasn't had a top 10 since March
20th4-0-0
DAVIS LOVE III
Until the PGA, was having the quietest year of his career. Last win: 2003 International
14th14-6-3
SCOTT VERPLANK
Grinder who chips and putts with the best of them. Gritty match player
23rdR
CP FRED COUPLES
At 45, still hits it as well as anyone--just don't count on him to do it for five matches
18th8-3-1
CP JUSTIN LEONARD
On paper his great short game looks perfect, but his poor record says otherwise
26th3-9-1

 

INTERNATIONALWorld RankPresidents Cup Record
VIJAY SINGH
Word is, Steve Williams will wear a hat that has VIJAY WHO? stitched on it
2nd12-11-2
ERNIE ELS
Out for the season. Hero of the 2003 Presidents Cup is impossible to replace
4th10-8-2
RETIEF GOOSEN
Beginning to wonder if we've got him wrong. Playing more like an underachiever
5th5-5-0
ADAM SCOTT
Only 25, but hasn't come close to living up to great expectations
7th3-2-0
ANGEL CABRERA
Four top 5s (including a win) in Europe this year. Long, but a hot-and-cold putter
12thR
TIM CLARK
Fairways-and-greens specialist may be the most underrated player in the world
17th2-3-0
MICHAEL CAMPBELL
Needs to step it up in Ernie's absence. Could be paired with Goosen or Singh
19th1-1-1
STUART APPLEBY
At PGA some asked, How did he make the team? Only two top 25s since February
25th3-7-1
MIKE WEIR
Has lost it. Before the PGA had missed the cut in six of his previous eight starts
27th6-4-0
NICK O'HERN
Lefty could be surprise star of the Presidents Cup. Best broom-handle putter in world
28thR
MARK HENSBY
Major force in '05: Masters (T5th), U.S. Open (T3rd), British Open (15th), PGA (59th)
29thR
CP TREVOR IMMELMAN
His great work on the greens earlier this year prompted Els to call for a ban on long putters
56thR
CP PETER LONARD
If it's windy, he's the man. Not much to show for low-ball hitter after Hilton Head in April
34th2-2-0

 

"We all wanted to win more than anything," Kelly said of the '03 Presidents Cup, "but WE UNDERSTOOD WHAT SHARING THE CUP WOULD DO FOR THE GAME."
COLOR PHOTOPhotograph by Fred VuichPERFECT ATTENDANCE Love, who clinched a spot on the U.S. team at the PGA, will have played in all six Presidents Cups.COLOR PHOTOSTUART FRANKLIN/GETTY IMAGESMAGIC MOMENT With darkness approaching in '03, Player and Nicklaus ingeniously settled on a tie.ELEVEN COLOR PHOTOSROBERT BECK (WOODS, MICKELSON, DIMARCO, CINK, LOVE, LEONARD, GOOSEN, SCOTT, APPLEBY, O'HERN, LONARD)TWO COLOR PHOTOSFRED VUICH (TOMS, CLARK)FOUR COLOR PHOTOSDAVID WALBERG (PERRY, FUNK, SINGH, WEIR)COLOR PHOTOAL TIELEMANS (FURYK)TWO COLOR PHOTOSJOHN BIEVER (VERPLANK, ELS)COLOR PHOTOJEFF GROSS/GETTY IMAGES (COUPLES)COLOR PHOTOPETE FONTAINE/WIREIMAGE.COM (CABRERA)COLOR PHOTOCHUCK SOLOMON (CAMPBELL)COLOR PHOTODARREN CARROLL (HENSBY)COLOR PHOTODARREN CARROLL/ICON SMI (IMMELMAN)