WHO: Chris DiMarco

WHAT: 144-yard nine-iron to 14 feet to set up the clinching birdie

WHERE: Par-4 18th at Robert Trent Jones Golf Club

WHEN: Presidents Cup singles

WHY
Most players would've had to improvise the shot Chris DiMarco played with the Presidents Cup on the line. Standing in a bunker with the ball on the grassy lip above his feet, DiMarco had to avoid pulling it to the left. To do that he simply took his normal swing--a unique Arnold Palmer--like action during which he leads with his left elbow and doesn't reach a full finish.

To hit a short iron when the ball is above your feet, you need to wing it--the term for a swing during which you lead with your left elbow and keep that elbow ahead of the clubhead all the way to a restricted finish. Arnold Palmer popularized the technique by using it on all of his shots, as DiMarco does. On this shot, choke down slightly, use your normal ball position and avoid hanging back on your right side.

Mitchell Spearman, a Golf Magazine Top 100 Teacher, works at Manhattan Woods Golf Club in West Nyack, N.Y.

... AND ANOTHER THING
"The ultimate question with Michelle Wie is this: Will she be golf's Anna Kournikova, another Annika Sorenstam or a combination of the two?"

MITCHELL'S TIP
If the Ball's Above Your Feet, Wing It

Top 100
TEACHERS POLL

Which pairing was the U.S.'s best?

DiMarco / Mickelson 72%

Furyk / Woods 28%

"With DiMarco and Mickelson, neither player dominated, but they played together as a perfect team."

--GARY WIREN
TRUMP INTERNATIONAL

PHOTOCOURTESY OF NBC (DIMARCO) PHOTOERICK W. RASCO PHOTOERICK W. RASCOJIM GUND (BACKGROUND) PHOTOROBERT BECK (DIMARCO AND MICKELSON)
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)