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Cliff Floyd

June 30, 2008
June 30, 2008

Table of Contents
June 30, 2008

SI Bonus Section: Golf Plus
SI.com
SI Players: LIFE ON AND OFF THE FIELD
NBA FINALS
  • Twenty-two years after their last NBA title the Celtics earned their 17th, as G.M. Danny Ainge reconnected the franchise (and this author) to a storied past of retired numbers, Hall of Famers and one-namers

BASEBALL
PRO FOOTBALL
TRACK AND FIELD
SOCCER
  • Her World Cup outburst violated the team-first ethos of women's sports and made her an outcast. Now Hope Solo is the U.S. goalie once again, bound for Beijing—and still trying to figure it all out

SPECIAL REPORT
Inside
Departments

Cliff Floyd

As told to Lisa Altobelli

RAYS DESIGNATED HITTER

This is an article from the June 30, 2008 issue

On leaving the Cubs to sign with the Rays as a free agent last December
It was real important to come to a Florida team because my family is here—my fiancée, Maryanne Manning; my daughter, Bria Shae, who's four; and my son, Tobias, who's three. I couldn't script a better ending to my career.

On the Rays' best-ever start
There are a bunch of young guys here, and everyone thought we were going to lose, but I knew we weren't. These guys have energy, and they seem in tune as a team.

On giving advice to young teammates
I hate to be the guy who says, "I've been around, and this is how it is," but I'd also never want a teammate to lose his job because of his attitude. I have seen guys lose opportunities because they can't shut up and go about their business. It's sad.

On his hobby, bowling
I've been bowling since I was a kid and watched the PBA. I loved how they could put a spin on the ball. I bought my own ball 10 years ago, I figured out the spin and I started getting crazy. I go by myself almost every day in the off-season. I use powder, shut my phone off and just focus. My high is 280, but I average around 210.

On his most difficult injury to overcome
My wrist [shattered in 1995]. You need it to hit. If you lose your quickness with the bat, you're going home to find a new job. At first [after surgery] I couldn't even pick up a piece of paper. My therapist would put it in front of me, and I would be there for 30 minutes, sweating, but I just couldn't do it.

On the latest addition to his workouts
I swim now. I have a pool, and I taught myself in the off-season. I halfway drowned the first couple of times but now I do a few laps before I'm dead tired; swimming works everything. My kids will jump in there with me with their floaties on. Sometimes I feel as if I could use floaties too.

The slugger, 35, is lending a veteran presence to keep his upstart club on a roll
PHOTOPHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL HEAPE