Broken
By Abby Wambach (above), her left leg, an injury that will keep the best U.S. women's soccer player out of the Olympics. Wambach, 28, collided with Brazilian defender Andreia Rosa during the first half of a game on the night of July 16 in San Diego. Wambach, who has scored 99 goals in 127 international games, had surgery the next day to insert a titanium rod into her leg; she will be out for 12 weeks. "My heart sank," said forward Natasha Kai, who replaced Wambach. "We need her. She's a big piece of a great team." The U.S. won the game, its final Olympic tune-up, 1--0.

Retired
After a 12-year major league career in which he won 123 games and threw two no-hitters, Hideo Nomo (right). The righthander became the second—and by far, the most high-profile—Japanese player in the big leagues when he signed with the Dodgers from the Kintetsu Buffaloes in 1995. He proved massively influential in both his homeland, where he sparked an interest in MLB, and in the U.S., where he opened the door for Japanese players. (There were 16 on Opening Day rosters this season.) "He showed that the level of Japanese baseball was not that different from the major leagues," said Japanese legend Sadaharu Oh.

Died
At age 100, Sherman (Jocko) Maxwell, who covered the Negro leagues for years and is widely considered to be the first black sportscaster. Maxwell, who was a postal clerk in Newark, began his radio career in New Jersey sometime around 1929. Later, his program Runs, Hits and Errors established him as one of the leading authorities on the Negro leagues. Maxwell also wrote stories for magazines and was the public address announcer for the Newark Eagles. According to his family, Maxwell was rarely paid during his four-decade radio career. "There would be very few records of the Negro leagues ... without him," said Jerry Izenberg, columnist emeritus for the Newark Star-Ledger. "He could sense the meaning of what he was doing. He knew that one day this stuff would be important."

Detained
For a mental health evaluation, mixed martial arts star Quinton (Rampage) Jackson (below). On July 15 Jackson, who lost the UFC light heavyweight title on July 5, was arrested by Costa Mesa, Calif., police after leading them on a high-speed chase in which he jumped a median and drove on the sidewalk—in a truck adorned with his picture. He was released on $25,000 bail, but the next day police came to his home after acquaintances told authorities they were concerned about his behavior. After police questioned him, Jackson, 30, was taken to a hospital.

Collapsed
After the 10th round of a fight on July 16, welterweight Oscar Diaz. He underwent surgery to relieve swelling on his brain that night and is still in a coma. Diaz, 25, was fighting Delvin Rodriguez (23-2-1, 14 KOs) in a bout televised by ESPN2. Before the start of the 11th round Diaz (26--3, 12), who appeared to be losing badly, collapsed on his stool. He was not responsive and was taken from the ring on a stretcher.

Requested
By the agent of Twins pitcher Francisco Liriano, that the players union investigate why the pitcher has been kept in Triple A. Liriano, an All-Star as a rookie in 2006, underwent Tommy John surgery following that season. He has been rehabbing with the Rochester (N.Y.) Red Wings since April and has gone 8--0 with a 2.53 ERA in his past 10 starts. His agent, Greg Genske, suggested that the Twins might be keeping Liriano in the minors so that he doesn't accumulate enough service time to become eligible for arbitration after this season. Minnesota G.M. Bill Smith said Liriano was being kept on the farm because the Twins' pitchers are performing better than expected. "When the major league team is playing well, that affects all the players in the minor leagues," he said.

SIGN OF THE APOCALYPSE

A 32-year-old man who was arrested for disrupting a baseball game in Massachusetts by riding a stolen motorbike around the bases told police he did it because "no one ever told him he couldn't."

They Said It

BILL WERBER
The oldest living ex--major leaguer (he's 100), on today's players:
"The hair's too long. Their beards are too evident. They're a grubby-looking bunch of caterwaulers."

PHOTOROBERT BENSON/US PRESSWIRE (WAMBACH) PHOTOPETER READ MILLER (NOMO) PHOTOKENT HORNER/WIREIMAGE/GETTY IMAGES (JACKSON) PHOTOGUS RUELAS/AP (DAN HAREN) PHOTODAMIAN STROHMEYER (MANNY RAMIREZ) PHOTODAMIAN STROHMEYER (JASON GIAMBI)
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)