Search

The Vault

April 19, 2010
April 19, 2010

Table of Contents
April 19, 2010

LEADING OFF
GOLF PLUS
Inside: THE WEEK IN SPORTS
THE MASTERS
PRO FOOTBALL
PLAYOFFS PREVIEW '10
JASON HEYWARD
Departments

The Vault

Every SI Story ... Every SI Photo ... Ever SI.COM/VAULT

This is an article from the April 19, 2010 issue

EXCERPT | April 20, 1964

King of Augusta

Arnold Palmer won a record fourth, and final, Masters

En route to a dominating Masters victory, Palmer put down a second-round insurrection led by Chi Chi Rodriguez. Alfred Wright reported for SI.

Friday was Arnold Palmer's. He played against an alien army, he played against Chi Chi Rodriguez, he played against the field—and he vanquished them all with ease. Something special goes on between Palmer and the Masters. It is a kind of love affair. He regards it with a reverence that he offers no other tournament, and its galleries regard him, in turn, as a chosen son. Now came tiny Chi Chi with a lively little guerrilla army that called itself Bandidos and his own hat-waving, jig-dancing, bowing, irreverent ways.

Palmer was hitting brilliant iron shots at the pin, just as he had the day before, and he made the turn in an effortless 35. But Rodriguez stuck right with him. Not only that, Chi Chi was outdriving Palmer and taking deep bows or doffing his hat in mock salute every time the gallery gave him—or Arnie—a cheer. His behavior seemed to get to Arnie. The dignity of the Masters was being trifled with, and Palmer began to look more purposeful with every step.

Finally, at the par-5 13th, the break came. Arnie outdrove Chi Chi by about a yard, but both had clear shots over the water and to the green. Chi Chi hit a beautiful three-wood onto the green and bowed deeply to the gallery. You could feel Palmer burn. He took a one-iron out of his bag (get that, Chi Chi: an iron, not a wood) and hit a truly memorable shot. It landed within a foot of the flagstick and ran five feet past. It was a magnificent, deadly, "take that" stroke. Chi Chi was done. The cards were on the table, and he had been called.

Palmer, age 34, won by six strokes. It was his final major victory.

SI.COM | Breaking News | Real-time Scores | Daily Analysis

NFL

MLB

NHL

GOLF

Editor's Choice

Need Arms? Tough

SI's Tom Verducci explains how teams are keeping their aces off the free-agent market

Got pitching? If not, your team may be in trouble if you expect to find help at the front of your rotation over the next few years. Last week Boston's Josh Beckett and Milwaukee's Yovani Gallardo were just the latest in a long line of some of the best pitchers in baseball who signed contracts that bought out free-agent years. In just the past 15 months the list of pitchers who signed long-term extensions reads like a Who's Who of aces: Zack Greinke of Kansas City, Roy Halladay of Philadelphia and Justin Verlander of Detroit (above). These kinds of extensions continue to make free agency inefficient because they keep top pitchers off the market in their prime years.

Featured Stories

A NEW ERA

By Andy Staples

How the Gators' offense will change under quarterback John Brantley

AWARDS WATCH

By Ian Thomsen

Bucks guard Brandon Jennings deserves Rookie of the Year honors

DÉJ√Ä VU

By Don Banks

Is NFL draft prospect Dez Bryant the next Randy Moss?

PHOTOPhotograph by JAMES DRAKEHOLDING COURT Palmer, here at the scorer's table after his victory, said that his '64 win at Augusta National was his greatest triumph. His final score of 276 was then the second-best in Masters history.PHOTOHEINZ KLUETMEIERPHOTOJOHN IACONOPHOTOJOHN BIEVERPHOTOGREG NELSON (VERLANDER)PHOTOGREG NELSON (JENNINGS)PHOTOMANNY MILLAN (MCNABB)PHOTOJONATHAN FERREY/GETTY IMAGES (RODRIGUEZ)PHOTOJOHN BIEVER (MICKELSON)PHOTOJOHN BIEVER (BRYANT)PHOTOBOB ROSATO (BRANTLEY)