Teeing Off

February 21, 2011

MY BAG

FOR THE NORTHERN TRUST OPEN

Bill Haas

"I carry a two-iron. It's easier to hit a hybrid higher, but more difficult to hit one straight for me."

1. DRIVER

Titleist

910 D2 (8.5°)

Titleist.com

SHAFT: Fujikura

Speeder 757 (X flex)

Fujikuragolf.com

2. FAIRWAY METAL

Titleist

910F (13.5°)

SHAFT: True Temper

Dynamic Gold X-100 (X flex)

Truetemper.com

3. IRONS

Titleist

CB (two through PW)

SHAFTS: True Temper

Dynamic Gold X-100 (X flex)

4. WEDGES

Vokey

Vokey Design (54° and 60°)

Vokey.com

SHAFTS: True Temper

Dynamic Gold X-100 (X flex)

5. PUTTER

Scotty Cameron

Kombi

Scottycameron.com

6. BALL

Titleist

Pro V1x

7. SHOES

FootJoy

FJ Icon

Footjoy.com

GRIPS

Golf Pride

New Decade

Golfpride.com

TECH TALK

Sweet Stretch

Cobra's new E9 technology proves that shape matters just as much as size

Most golfers don't hit the ball on the center of the club face on every shot, so it's good news that by manipulating the shape and weighting of a clubhead it's possible to extend and alter the so-called sweet spot—that portion of the face that provides optimal launch conditions. But which shape and orientation provides the most benefit?

Faced with that question, the engineers at Cobra tracked the hit patterns of golfers on 25,000 shots and discovered that most impacts take place within a slightly tilted oblong area around the center of the face. They then designed clubs like the S3 driver (below) with a taller elliptical face that has a sweet spot to match the hit pattern.

Hits charted in tests

Taller oblong face expands sweet spot

Typical sweet spot

SEE

TRY

BUY

@GOLF.com

THREE PHOTOSKOHJIRO KINNO (HAAS, BAG, BALL) PHOTOCOURTESY OF FOOTJOY (SHOES) TWO ILLUSTRATIONSCOURTESY OF COBRA THREE ILLUSTRATIONS

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)