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LEADING OFF

Sept. 12, 2011
Sept. 12, 2011

Table of Contents
Sept. 12, 2011

LEADING OFF
Inside: THE WEEK IN SPORTS
TEN YEARS
  • The games we watched played a substantial role in fostering a return to normalcy after 9/11. In the decade since the attack, with two wars still raging, sports still provide comfort—but they have also inspired, united and reminded

COLLEGE FOOTBALL
BASEBALL
  • The Braves' three-headed relief monster—two parts lefty, one part Rookie of the Year front-runner, 100% filthy—has made life historically brutish and short for hitters. Now all the trio needs is a worthy nickname

TRACK AND FIELD
PRO BASKETBALL
  • No one loves the game more than the Mercury guard, a leading contender for WNBA MVP, but even she didn't understand what hoops meant to her until a string of harrowing events threatened to derail her career

TCU Coach GARY PATTERSON
  • Twenty-five years ago TCU coach Gary Patterson was a tumbleweed assistant clinging to a Division II job. No one expected he would rise to the top of his profession—not even the author, who lived with him then

POINT AFTER
Departments

LEADING OFF

PHOTOPhotograph by Fred VuichTHERE WAS SOMETHING IN THE AIR Lightning does strike twice in the same place, as separate storms forced weather delays totaling nearly three hours (and prompting one stadium evacuation) in last Saturday's Notre Dame--South Florida game in South Bend. Despite the best efforts of linebacker Carlo Calabrese (44), the Irish were unable to generate similar electricity in their season opener, falling 23--20.PHOTOPhotograph by Bob MartinA SHOT IN THE DARK Reese Hoffa finished fifth and was part of a balanced U.S. shot put contingent that also took fourth, seventh and eighth at the world track and field championships in Daegu, South Korea, last weekend. Like the mountains that hang over Daegu Stadium, Jamaica's Usain Bolt loomed majestically over the nine-day event, winning the 200 meters and anchoring a world-record finish in the 4 √ó 100 (page 52).PHOTOPhotograph by Carlos M. SaavedraA SHADOW OF HERSELF The color of the court at Arthur Ashe Stadium captured Maria Sharapova's mood last Friday at the U.S. Open as the No. 3 seed and 2006 champion was upset by 26th seed Flavia Pennetta of Italy 3--6, 6--3, 4--6 in the third round. Sharapova was one of a host of top players who stumbled in the first week of a topsy-turvy Open (page 32). Pennetta went on to defeat 13th seed Shuai Peng of China on Sunday to advance to the quarterfinals.