Nov. 14, 2011
Nov. 14, 2011

Table of Contents
Nov. 14, 2011

  • As the sidelined Peyton Manning looks on in dismay, the winless Colts are enduring a disastrous season that could put them in position to draft ... his successor. A team and a town are conflicted.



The chip on Jerry West's shoulder from years of emotional suffering was obviously used as motivation to prove his self-worth. Unfortunately, that same suffering has resulted in a life filled with depression. I hope West realizes that it's not a sign of weakness to seek help, but one of strength.

This is an article from the Nov. 14, 2011 issue

Haig Musurlian, Laguna Hills, Calif.

God bless Jerry West for having the courage to share his remarkable story (Basketball Was the Easy Part, Oct. 24). As a 61-year-old sports fan who has suffered through his share of personal trauma, I was so touched after reading your article. It truly gave me strength to continue healing.

Louis Saltzman Glen Head, N.Y.

After reading this story, I don't think West has conquered his demons. His behavior toward the restaurant manager was as abusive as his father's treatment of him. I hope before he concludes this life he finds peace.

Arturo Thurin, Bayamón, P.R.

I thought your cover headline THE COURAGE OF JERRY WEST was far too kind. Each year millions of Americans struggle with the horrors of depression. The truly courageous are those who find a way to deal with the disease without holding grudges or blaming others for their perceived failures. West, it seems, has been unable to do either.

Thomas Crosslin

Stoneham, Mass.

Forever Moore

I was pleased to see SI make the case that Kellen Moore of Boise State is one of the greatest college quarterbacks ever (Moore with Less, Oct. 24). I was fortunate to see him play Fresno State last month. I came away thinking he is definitely the real deal.

Frank Armbrust

Yuba City, Calif.

What is Moore's secret to becoming the winningest quarterback in history? How about the pathetic schedule that Boise State plays. In addition to their tough conference matchups, top teams such as Alabama and LSU face high-caliber opponents such as Oregon and Penn State each year. Makes you wonder how many wins Moore would have if his Broncos had stronger competition.

Bill Kling Jr., Huntsville, Ala.

Past Transgressions

In your chart Goats of Octobers Past (SCORECARD, Oct. 24), Ben Freed makes the point that Jose Mesa's blown save for the Indians in the ninth inning of Game 7 of the 1997 World Series "should earn him at least a share of the blame." Well, Freed doesn't have to worry: Mesa has always received the lion's share of the blame in Cleveland. A distant second would be manager Mike Hargrove for putting Mesa into the game in the first place. While Tony Fernandez's error was costly, long-suffering Tribe fans certainly don't consider him the goat.

Rick Rohrich, Tucson

I agree that Bill Buckner shouldn't be the only one blamed for the Red Sox' loss to the Mets in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series. Why didn't Boston manager John McNamara use his best defensive team in the bottom of the 10th, when he only had to protect a two-run lead to win the Series? Buckner was ailing because of a left-ankle injury and should never have been on the field.

Mark Phillips

Kansas City, Mo.




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